Fresh ideas for spring

Cap­ture more orig­i­nal sea­sonal close-ups with our in­spi­ra­tional guide

NPhoto - - News -

Macro photography al­ways cap­tures our eye, be­cause the dis­tor­tion of scale and level of de­tail that we are not familiar with draws our at­ten­tion. This makes the familiar, un­fa­mil­iar, mak­ing us think twice about what we are see­ing.

Na­ture is an abun­dant source of sub­jects for macro work, and most pho­tog­ra­phers try their hand at plant and wildlife macros at some point. Spring is the per­fect time to give this a go, with the longer days and warmer weather, the vi­brant flow­ers and greens spring­ing back to life.

While there are sev­eral meth­ods for cap­tur­ing images close up, if you’re se­ri­ous about macro photography you’ll need a ded­i­cated macro lens. This is a lens that can fo­cus ex­cep­tion­ally close to a sub­ject; be wary of lenses claim­ing macro fea­tures, as not all will de­liver the re­sults you ex­pect. A true macro lens will fo­cus around 10-15cm away from the sub­ject. You can get a va­ri­ety of

Be wary of lenses claim­ing macro fea­tures, as not all will de­liver the re­sults you ex­pect. A true macro lens will fo­cus around 10-15cm away from the sub­ject

fo­cal lengths for macro, and most are prime lenses. Each lens is suited for a dif­fer­ent use, from 50mm (ideal for por­traits) up to 105mm, 150mm and even higher for shoot­ing in­sects and other minute crea­tures/ob­jects.

The ba­sic tech­nique can take a lit­tle time to mas­ter. Aut­o­fo­cus can of­ten strug­gle when you’re shoot­ing macros, while fo­cus­ing man­u­ally can also prove chal­leng­ing be­cause you’re so close to your sub­ject that any slight move­ment can lead to com­pletely the wrong part of your im­age be­ing sharp. How­ever, with prac­tice you’ll get the knack, and the re­sults will be greatly re­ward­ing. We’re go­ing to try it on six sea­sonal sub­jects…

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