Look for shap e and pa ttern

NPhoto - - Special Feature -

What ’s the Big Idea?

Shapes and pat­terns are im­por­tant el­e­ments in land­scape pho­tog­ra­phy. They cre­ate vis­ual rhythm and har­mony that brings im­pact to an im­age. If you think of any shape or pat­tern, the ba­sis of these el­e­ments are lines. Line is the struc­ture of all pho­to­graphs, ei­ther in a sub­tle or ob­vi­ous way. When you use lines cre­atively in a com­po­si­tion they can evoke dif­fer­ent emo­tions: di­ag­o­nal lines sug­gest ac­tion and move­ment, hor­i­zon­tal ones cre­ate a sense of tran­quil­ity and peace, and ver­ti­cal lines sug­gest a feel­ing of power and strength. When lines form a clear pat­tern, they can cre­ate a more suc­cess­ful im­age. Pat­terns are ev­ery­where in na­ture and man-made ob­jects.

What ’s the Key?

The key to find­ing pat­terns is to ex­plore a va­ri­ety of dif­fer­ent an­gles in or­der to seek out any rep­e­ti­tion. Lens choice will make a huge dif­fer­ence in how well the pat­terns are cap­tured. Depend­ing on the scene, I find a medium-to-long tele­photo works well to com­press the pat­terns, as was the case with the wind tur­bines here. When you com­bine pat­terns with great light, it only re­in­forces the com­po­si­tion. I chose early morn­ing light on the white tur­bines so they would trans­form into gold against the po­larised blue sky. I chose a short enough shut­ter speed (1/4 sec) to blur the ro­ta­tion of the tur­bines and add an el­e­ment of mo­tion. This cre­ated an in­ter­est­ing shape that made them look like pin­wheels.

di­ag­o­nal lines sug­gest ac­tion and move­ment, hor­i­zon­tal ones cre­ate a sense of tran­quil­ity, and ver­ti­cal lines sug­gest pow er

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