Cre­ative tech­niques Dou­ble the drama

Re­flect­ing on busy ur­ban life, Tom Welsh heads out to du­pli­cate a cityscape us­ing lit­tle more than per­spex, per­spec­tive and pre­ci­sion

NPhoto - - Nikon Skills -

For a new take on the stan­dard cityscape, we are go­ing to turn busy, in­ner-city life up­side down. Us­ing a com­bi­na­tion of per­spec­tive and per­spex, you can repli­cate any cityscape in a strik­ing re­flec­tion.

Look around and you’ll find plenty of suit­able build­ings for re­flec­tions, es­pe­cially in the cen­tre of a city. Of course, you can find many re­flec­tions in win­dows and wa­ter, but these don’t quite give the re­mark­able clar­ity you can achieve us­ing a su­per-smooth shiny sur­face.

The method is sim­ple: you po­si­tion a re­flec­tive sheet of ma­te­rial in front of a cityscape to dou­ble up the scene. A mir­ror is the ob­vi­ous thing to use, but a wide va­ri­ety of ma­te­ri­als will work for this tech­nique, and for our shoot we opted for a sheet of black per­spex. The per­spex was re­flec­tive enough to give a mir­ror-like re­flec­tion, although the im­age was only vis­i­ble

A mir­ror is the ob­vi­ous thing to use, but a wide va­ri­ety of ma­te­ri­als will work for this tech­nique, and for our shoot we opted for a sheet of black per­spex

when look­ing low down and di­rectly across the sheet. This is be­cause the dis­tance be­tween the cam­era and the sub­ject will af­fect where you have to stand in or­der to cap­ture the mir­rored scene; if we’d placed the per­spex at the base of a build­ing, we’d have had to look al­most straight down to see the re­flec­tion of our sub­ject.

There are some tricky tech­niques to master if you’re to pull this ef­fect off. Don’t let that put you off, though, as with some pre­cise po­si­tion­ing you will be able to re­flect your favourite scene with ease, and gain a greater un­der­stand­ing of per­spec­tive and light to fur­ther your pho­tog­ra­phy.

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