Go grace­fully grey

You can se­lec­tively lighten or darken greyscale tones in a mono con­ver­sion based on the orig­i­nal colours of the im­age – Ge­orge Cairns ex­plains all

NPhoto - - Contents -

Use Lightroom to se­lec­tively lighten or darken greyscale tones in a mono con­ver­sion by tweak­ing the orig­i­nal colours of the im­age

When shoot­ing with black-and-white film, pho­tog­ra­phers can place a coloured fil­ter over the cam­era’s lens to pro­duce more strik­ing pictures. Dif­fer­ent coloured fil­ters lighten or darken the greyscale tones of spe­cific ob­jects in the scene. For ex­am­ple, if you place a red fil­ter over the lens it makes blue skies ap­pear dark grey in the mono­chrome print, so lighter clouds pop out in con­trast.

Your Nikon’s Mono­chrome Pic­ture Con­trol set­ting en­ables you to pro­duce a black-and­white photo in-cam­era. You can even set it to ap­ply colour fil­ters that help lighten or darken greyscale tones in par­tic­u­lar ar­eas, such as blue skies or green fields (you’ll find this in the Mono­chrome Pic­ture Con­trol’s ad­vanced set­tings). This in-cam­era ap­proach can be hit and miss, so we’ll show you how to take more con­trol of greyscale tones in your mono­chrome conversions in Lightroom.

There are sev­eral ways to cre­ate a mono­chrome im­age in Lightroom. If you sim­ply set Sat­u­ra­tion to 0, you’ll get an in­stant mono con­ver­sion, but you risk pro­duc­ing a drab wash of greys, es­pe­cially if the shot con­sists mostly of mid­tones. An eye-catch­ing mono­chrome photo has a wide range of tones, from black shad­ows to white high­lights. Let’s see how to get bet­ter black-and-white images…

If you sim­ply set Sat­u­ra­tion to 0… you risk pro­duc­ing a drab wash of greys

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