Fo­cus on the fa­mil­iar

If you want to hone your wildlife pho­tog­ra­phy skills close to home, there’s no sub­ject bet­ter than the hum­ble squir­rel, says Ja­son Par­nell-Brookes

NPhoto - - Photo Contents -

Use a wide aper­ture, choose a sim­ple back­ground and zoom right in close to cap­ture ex­cit­ing squir­rel por­traits

Most peo­ple in the world have ac­cess to some kind of an­i­mal, whether do­mes­tic or wild. And many places around the world have some type of squir­rel, or squir­rel-type an­i­mal (such as a chip­munk). Al­most ev­ery­one we know has, at some point, taken their Nikon to the lo­cal park and snapped some shots of a squir­rel, but very few of the photos look like any­thing more than snaps. We’re go­ing to show you how to take bet­ter pictures of crea­tures you might oth­er­wise over­look.

We’re go­ing to show you how to take bet­ter pictures of crea­tures you might over­look

Get­ting started is sim­ple: just wan­der down to your near­est park or woods, Nikon fit­ted with tele­photo lens in hand. After that, get on your belly and start pho­tograph­ing the wild an­i­mals.

In this tu­to­rial we’re pho­tograph­ing grey squir­rels in the UK, but you can pho­to­graph what­ever crea­tures you’ve got lo­cally. We’re sure you’ve tried this be­fore, but there’s a few ex­pert tweaks that you need to do to make your photos stand out above the rest.

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