Next up: to cap­ture as much de­tail as pos­si­ble in one shot

YOUR PHOTO CHAL­LENGE: GO SHOOT… An HDR im­age

NPhoto - - Contributors -

Our next chal­lenge was a tech­nique-based one: shoot a high-dy­namic range (HDR) im­age. This process re­quires you to take a se­quence of brack­eted ex­po­sures with the cam­era sta­tion­ary through­out. The best bits of each ex­po­sure are then merged into a sin­gle im­age that re­tains masses of de­tail in the shad­ows and the high­lights – some­thing that might oth­er­wise be im­pos­si­ble to achieve in one pic­ture.

It’s easy to over­cook the HDR ef­fect, with the po­ten­tial for al­tered sun­rises and sun­sets to look more like nu­clear blasts, but ar­chi­tec­ture shots that in­clude brightly lit win­dows and dark in­te­ri­ors are ripe for this treat­ment.

Tewkes­bury Abbey and its mag­nif­i­cent stained-glass win­dows made the per­fect choice of lo­ca­tion for this task. Chris tried a num­ber of views within the abbey be­fore set­tling on this one, us­ing five sep­a­rate merged ex­po­sures to achieve the fi­nal im­age. Mar­cus tried cre­at­ing some ‘ver­tora­mas’ – ver­ti­cal panora­mas – to take in the floor-to-ceil­ing view, but it turned out he didn’t have the pa­tience to shoot five ex­po­sures for each frame!

EX­PO­SURE 2–30 secs, f/16, ISO100 LENS Nikon 16-35mm f/4

A winn ing com­bi­na­tion We used Pho­to­shop’s Merge to HDR Pro com­mand to au­to­mat­i­cally com­bine the five sep­a­rate ex­po­sures that make up the fi­nal shot

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