Q books: VIN­TAGE EROTIC IM­AGES

Go­liath Books presents... Mar­quis De Sade – 100 Erotic Il­lus­tra­tions Vin­tage erotic edi­tion!

Q Magazine - - Q Books -

To buy a copy, please go to: http://www.go­liath­books.com

Mar­quis De Sade has shocked for gen­er­a­tions, was sen­tenced to death, his books were cen­sored, artists, au­thors as well as psy­chol­o­gists have dealt with his work. De Sade writ­ings be­came the sym­bol of the for­bid­den world­wide – per­ver­sion personified. Now, for the first time, Go­liath Books presents a unique text-free col­lec­tion of all erotic il­lus­tra­tions of De Sade's works, pub­lished as a beau­ti­ful hardcover book.

The Mar­quis De Sade's writ­ings have since ex­pe­ri­enced a great deal: they have been for­bid­den, burnt, banned, cen­sored, and in­ter­preted by notable psy­chol­o­gists and writ­ers. In the age of Porn­hub, how­ever, De Sade's scan­dalous writ­ings are far below the arousal thresh­old that their im­age would lead us to as­sume.

Mar­quis de Sade

In France at the end of the eigh­teenth cen­tury, Dona­tien Alphonse François, Mar­quis de Sade, hired an artist to il­lus­trate his col­lected writ­ings. This edi­tion, pub­lished in 1797, con­tained 101 cop­per en­grav­ings with sex scenes, most of them of a sado­masochis­tic lean­ing. At the time, such “co­chon­ner­ies” (ob­scen­i­ties) brought one di­rectly into a dun­geon. For this rea­son, most artists in the erotic genre re­mained anony­mous, some­thing which makes it dif­fi­cult to­day to as­cribe au­thor­ship.

The Mar­quis de Sade, born in Paris in 1740, a rel­a­tive of the French royal fam­ily, is known to this day as per­ver­sion personified. He grew up in the care of an un­cle, and be­came an of­fi­cer in the cara­bi­neer reg­i­ment. Af­ter fight­ing in the Seven Years' War, how­ever, he rad­i­cally changed his life­style, and the Mar­quis quickly squan­dered his en­tire for­tune in gambling rooms and on mis­tresses. His par­ents then mar­ried him to a wealthy woman, but this did noth­ing to hold him back from var­i­ous ex­tra­mar­i­tal re­la­tion­ships.

De Sade as­so­ci­ated with pros­ti­tutes, and is also said not only to have reg­u­larly com­pelled ser­vants and maids to per­form sex­ual acts, but - even worse at that time - also “blas­phe­mous” acts. It was be­cause of this life­style change, of­fi­cially la­belled “lewd”, that in 1765 he was im­pris­oned for the first time. Un­re­pen­tant, though, af­ter­wards he con­tin­ued to throw or­gies. He did not al­ways in­vite peo­ple to this or­gies, in­stead at times tak­ing ad­van­tage of his so­cial po­si­tion to force them to par­tic­i­pate. In 1768 he was de­nounced for the se­ri­ous abuse and whip­ping of a lady, but was able to avoid a trial by pay­ing an in­dem­nity.

Fol­low­ing this, two pros­ti­tutes made the al­le­ga­tion that De Sade had used an aphro­disiac to make them com­pli­ant for group sex and anal in­ter­course. This time the Mar­quis had to flee - he has­tened away to Italy, tak­ing his young sis­ter-in-law with him. He was sen­tenced to death in his ab­sence. In 1777 he re­turned to Paris and was ar­rested, though his death sen­tence was re­duced to life im­pris­on­ment. It was dur­ing his in­car­cer­a­tion that he wrote the most part of his works. Know­ing how of­fen­sive his writ­ings were to both the mo­ral and re­li­gious norms of the times, he at­tempted not to draw at­ten­tion to him­self through high pa­per use, and wrote ev­ery­thing in tiny hand­writ­ing. In 1789, with the storm­ing of the Bastille, De Sade was freed, but many of his writ­ings were de­stroyed in the revo­lu­tion­ary tur­moil.

As a noble per­son, De Sade was un­will­ing to adapt to the so­cial changes of the revo­lu­tion, and was in­car­cer­ated once again and for the sec­ond time sen­tenced to death. As a re­sult of Robe­spierre's fall in 1794, how­ever, he es­caped the guil­lo­tine, and fi­nally came free from prison, only to be sent a short time later to a lu­natic asy­lum be­cause of his debts and a law­suit. The di­ag­no­sis was “in­sanely ob­sessed with vice”. His death in 1814, at least, was “nat­u­ral” by the stan­dards of his time.

The Mar­quis de Sade's writ­ings have since ex­pe­ri­enced a great deal: they have been for­bid­den, burnt, banned, cen­sored, and in­ter­preted by notable psy­chol­o­gists and writ­ers. This is not sur­pris­ing since they are com­plex, con­tain shock­ing scenes be­tween all gen­ders, as well as hu­mil­i­a­tion, sodomy, in­cest and mur­der, hemmed with mo­ral-philo­soph­i­cal dis­cus­sions, anti-cler­i­cal­ism and jus­ti­fi­ca­tions for (his) rad­i­cal ego­ism. In the age of YouPorn, how­ever, De Sade's scan­dalous writ­ings are far below the arousal thresh­old that their im­age would lead us to as­sume.

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