Light sensor keeps you awake

Right be­hind the eyes, a light me­ter helps your body dis­tin­guish be­tween night and day.

Science Illustrated - - SENSES -

Your bi­o­log­i­cal clock is re­ally a bun­dle of brain cells known as the suprachi­as­matic core. The brain re­gion keeps track of night and day via nerve links to the retina of the eye, which mea­sure the quan­tity of light around you. Based on the light in­ten­sity, the suprachi­as­matic core re­duces or in­creases the quan­tity of hor­mones such as mela­tonin and cor­ti­sol, which af­fect how tired you feel and how much en­ergy your body is con­vert­ing.

The bi­o­log­i­cal clock can be con­fused, if you are af­fected by bright com­puter or smart­phone light right be­fore bed­time. Ac­cord­ing to stud­ies, the light from the de­vices sup­press the mela­tonin sleep hor­mone, changes the cir­ca­dian rhythm, and makes us less at­ten­tive the next morn­ing – not to men­tion it causes in­som­nia!

PINEAL BODY SIG­NALS TO THE BODY LIGHT SUPRACHI­AS­MATIC CORE MELA­TONIN

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