Smog in­jures and kills

Science Illustrated - - TECHNOLOGY -

EM­BRYO MALFORMATION

Moth­ers liv­ing in badly pol­luted ar­eas of­ten have chil­dren with low birth weights and un­der­de­vel­oped heads.

DE­LAYED MEN­TAL DEVEL­OP­MENT

Ac­cord­ing to a study, school chil­dren from an area with bad air pol­lu­tion showed de­layed men­tal devel­op­ment.

UN­DER­DE­VEL­OPED LUNG FUNC­TION

Ac­cord­ing to a study, young peo­ple in an area with bad PM pol­lu­tion suf­fered a five times higher risk of im­paired lung func­tion.

OVERWEIGHT

Some air pol­lu­tion chem­i­cals con­trib­ute

to on­set of obe­sity. Then, obese peo­ple can be more sen­si­tive to air pol­lu­tion.

DI­A­BETES

Chil­dren and adults sub­jected to in­creased air pol­lu­tion are bad at pro­duc­ing in­sulin, so they risk de­vel­op­ing di­a­betes.

LUNG FUNC­TION LOSS

PM pol­lu­tion blocks the lungs' fine alve­oli, mak­ing it dif­fi­cult to breathe and re­duc­ing phys­i­cal ac­tiv­ity.

AR­TE­RIOSCLE­RO­SIS AND BLOOD CLOTS

Sci­en­tists have linked traf­fic den­sity in res­i­den­tial ar­eas with the preva­lence of ar­te­rioscle­ro­sis and blood clots.

LUNG CAN­CER

When the con­cen­tra­tion of par­ti­cles in­creases by 5 mi­cro­grammes/m3 of air, the risk of lung can­cer in­creases by 18 %.

ALZHEIMER'S AND DE­MEN­TIA

The re­sult of a study from 2017 in­di­cates that air pol­lu­tion is re­spon­si­ble for 21 % of all de­men­tia cases world­wide.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.