Ra­dioac­tive Ma­te­rial Lets Heat Loose In Re­ac­tor

A ra­dioac­tive core emits heat into a re­ac­tor, in which mo­tors con­vert the heat into power. In the fu­ture, the small power plant is to sup­ply a Mar­tian base.

Science Illustrated - - CONTENTS -

A CORE OF RA­DIOAC­TIVE URA­NIUM FIS­SURES,

emit­ting heat, when a con­trol rod made of hard min­eral is ex­tracted from the core. The rod re­mains stuck in the core, un­til the re­ac­tor is placed on Mars.

BERYLLIUM RINGS REG­U­LATE,

how quickly the re­ac­tor's atomic core fis­sures, so the other parts of the re­ac­tor can keep up.

COOL­ING PAN­ELS RE­CEIVE

sur­plus heat from the mo­tors. The pan­els un­fold like an um­brella, once the re­ac­tor is placed on Mars.

PIS­TONS MOVE UP AND DOWN MO­TORS,

when the heat en­ters them, gen­er­at­ing me­chan­i­cal en­ergy, which the mo­tors con­vert into elec­tric en­ergy for the Mars colony.

PIPES WITH LIQ­UID SODIUM DI­RECT THE HEAT

from the nu­clear fis­sion to the mo­tors – with­out the use of pumps. The lack of a pump­ing sys­tem means that the re­ac­tor is more re­li­able.

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