From ac­ci­dent to im­prove­ment

The light on the aisle floor is only one ex­am­ple of safety fea­tures that have be­come oblig­a­tory in all air­lin­ers as a re­sult of a crash.

Science Illustrated - - TECHNOLOGY/ PLANE CRASHES -

1971: PLANE HITS MOUN­TAIN SIDE IN DENSE FOG

Ac­ci­dent: At an al­ti­tude of 750 m, a Boe­ing 727 ap­proach­ing the Juneau Air­port in Alaska strikes a moun­tain side and is de­stroyed. Be­cause of dense fog and clouds, the pi­lots weren't able to see any­thing. Re­sult: All ma­jor planes are equipped with the Ground Prox­im­ity Warn­ing sys­tem. Ob­jects that rise above the fly­ing al­ti­tude are marked in red on a dis­play.

1983: LAVATORY FIRE HAS FA­TAL CON­SE­QUENCES

Ac­ci­dent: Dur­ing a flight from Dal­las, Texas, to Toronto, Canada, a Dou­glas DC-9 must force-land due to fire. The smoke makes it dif­fi­cult for pas­sen­gers to find the emer­gency ex­its, and 23 peo­ple die. Re­sult: The floors of all air­lin­ers in­clude shin­ing stripes that guide pas­sen­gers to the emer­gency ex­its in the dark. Smoke alarms be­come manda­tory in lava­to­ries.

1985: FLEE­ING PAS­SEN­GERS TRAPPED BY EMER­GENCY EXIT

Ac­ci­dent: A Boe­ing 737 aban­dons take-off in Manch­ester Air­port due to fire, im­me­di­ately land­ing again. Dur­ing the evac­u­a­tion, an emer­gency exit "traf­fic jam" makes 55 peo­ple die of smoke in­hala­tion. Re­sult: At the emer­gency ex­its above the wings, seats are re­moved to al­low more space for evac­u­a­tion, and stan­dard evac­u­a­tion pro­ce­dures are in­tro­duced.

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