WHY DOES IT FEEL COLD TO BITE INTO MINT?

Science Illustrated - - ASK US -

Bit­ing into chew­ing gum or mints can cause a cold sen­sa­tion in the mouth, though the tem­per­a­ture does not change. The sen­sa­tion is due to the men­thol chem­i­cal af­fect­ing pro­teins in nerves that nor­mally regis­ter cold. Lots of men­thol can cause mod­er­ate pain be­cause of this.

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