SUM­MER SUN SAFETY

WITH THE TURN OF THE SEA­SON COMES THE MUCH-AN­TIC­I­PATED WARMER WEATHER OF SUM­MER

Style Magazine - - Health And Wellbeing - BY LIBBY BUT­LER

How­ever, as most of us will want to soak up the sun for the rest of the year, we all need to be mind­ful that the sun isn’t soak­ing us up.

Sun safety is an es­sen­tial part of main­tain­ing our over­all health, how­ever there is one im­por­tant step in the sun safety rou­tine which is of­ten over­looked — es­pe­cially by the fash­ion-con­scious.

Wear­ing a hat could make the dif­fer­ence be­tween you get­ting the most out of the sun this year, and the sun get­ting the most out of you.

Wear­ing a hat is a vi­tal step in the sun safety rou­tine.

They pro­tect your scalp, face and neck from ex­po­sure to harm­ful ul­tra­vi­o­let rays.

While hats have long held the rep­u­ta­tion of hav­ing the sole pur­pose of ru­in­ing sum­mer hair­styles, they do play an im­por­tant role in min­imis­ing the risk of get­ting burnt on sen­si­tive skin ar­eas like your hair­line, cheeks, neck or ears — sun­screen can’t pro­tect these ar­eas all by it­self.

Be­sides the short-term con­se­quences of not wear­ing a hat, over­ex­po­sure to sun-rays can lead to skin can­cers form­ing on these ar­eas.

These skin can­cers will most likely have to be re­moved sur­gi­cally or frozen off, both of which leave scars.

If these can­cers are left too long, they would ei­ther have to be treated with ra­di­a­tion, which leads to hair loss in the af­fected area, or chemo­ther­apy, which causes hair loss all over.

Surely hav­ing hat hair is worth the strug­gle if it means we get to keep our much-cher­ished locks — be­sides, be­ing healthy is al­ways on trend.

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