For Honor, Sniper Elite 4, Halo Wars 2 and more.

WE RE­VIEW THE LAT­EST BIG-RE­LEASE AND IN­DIE GAMES ON PC AND CON­SOLES, START­ING WITH THE FANTASY MULTIPLAYER GAME FOR HONOR.

TechLife Australia - - WELCOME - [ PC AND CON­SOLE GAMES ] [ SHAUN PRESCOTT ]

For Honor

UBISOFT DE­LIV­ERS A CALM, CON­SID­ERED AND ART­FUL HACK AND SLASHER. PC, PS4, XO | $99.95 | www.forhonor.com A CUR­SORY LOOK at screen­shots sug­gests For Honor is yet an­other stock stan­dard griz­zly ac­tion game, but it’s a bit smarter than your av­er­age hack­fest. In­deed, while there is much hack­ing and slash­ing to be had in Ubisoft’s new multiplayer-fo­cused ti­tle, the game re­lies heav­ily on tac­ti­cal hand-to-hand com­bat, de­mand­ing both pre­ci­sion and close at­ten­tion to the move­ments and in­ten­tions of your op­po­nent.

First things first: For Honor is a multiplayer-fo­cused game, but there is a sin­gle-player cam­paign, which does a de­cent job of both driv­ing home the com­bat’s in­tri­ca­cies while spin­ning a bat­shit crazy but none­the­less en­joy­able yarn. The en­e­mies you’ll face come in two gen­eral cat­e­gories, in­clud­ing the min­ions you can smite with­out a sec­ond thought, through to the tougher en­e­mies you’ll need to en­gage in more tense com­bat. The lat­ter is where the meat of the game’s nov­elty lies, and it’s why For Honor feels more like a fight­ing game — think Dark Souls crossed with SoulCal­ibur — than it does any­thing else. Oh, and as for the “bat­shit crazy” an­gle, you can play as a Knight, a Vik­ing or a Sa­mu­rai in this game — stupid if his­tory is your bag, but ex­cel­lent if va­ri­ety is more im­por­tant to you.

Once you’ve fin­ished the sin­gle­player mode in about 6–8 hours, the multiplayer is where the rest of your time, nay life, will be spent. Do­min­ion, Death­match and Du­els are the main modes, and all have their strengths: the first is a point cap­ture mode with four hu­man play­ers on each team, aug­mented by the afore­men­tioned min­ions. Death­match is what that name im­plies, while Du­els are, ar­guably, the most fun you’ll have in multiplayer. In­deed, the 1v1 du­els are among the most stripped back and in­tense scraps I’ve had in a multiplayer game since Dark Souls, sharp­en­ing the game’s com­bat into fraught psy­cho­log­i­cal war­fare be­tween you and NoS­copeBro204 from War­rnam­bool (yes, For Honor has lo­cal servers).

There’s a fac­tion-based meta game draped over th­ese PvP modes, but the game is still too young to judge whether it’ll prove en­gross­ing or su­per­flu­ous. In fact, much like Ubisoft’s Rain­bow Six Siege (and, we sup­pose, many other multiplayer-fo­cused ti­tles), the suc­cess of this game will de­pend on how ded­i­cated its user­base is, and how well Ubisoft sup­ports it. At launch, it’s easy to get a game and For Honor is a joy to play, but whether or not the same could be said in six months’ time or a year is yet to be seen.

As­sum­ing For Honor builds a pas­sion­ate user­base, it’s a unique hobby game with a lot of po­ten­tial. We hope it shines.

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