Beau­ti­ful corsets pin-up girl’s dream

Toowoomba’s Lor­raine White started White­lane Tex­tiles af­ter dis­cov­er­ing that teach­ing wasn’t for her. She spoke to re­porter KATE DODD about her love of corsetry and the QUT 2017 Fash­ion Ac­cel­er­a­tor pro­gram.

The Chronicle - - LIFE DIVA -

THE word corset con­jures up im­ages of Vic­to­rian-era women fuss­ing to get into con­trap­tions laced up so tightly they can’t breathe any more and faint.

Nowa­days, though, a corset is more likely to been seen on a bur­lesque dancer or a pin-up beauty - and they def­i­nitely would not be so un­com­fort­able they’d pass out.

Toowoomba woman Lor­raine White, who owns White­lane Tex­tiles, is in­spired by the beauty of a gor­geous corset and the shape they give a woman.

Her in­ter­est in corsetry was born out of her time at the Univer­sity of South­ern Queens­land where she stud­ied fine arts.

She took up a ca­reer as a teacher af­ter her univer­sity stud­ies, teach­ing ge­og­ra­phy at Mt Mor­gan.

The 34-year-old de­cided that teach­ing wasn’t for her af­ter 18 months and started White­lane Tex­tiles.

While she does a lot of sewing, millinery and knit­ting, corsetry is re­ally where her pas­sion lies.

The ma­jor­ity of her cus­tomers were part of the pin-up com­mu­nity, she said.

“From a tech­ni­cal per­spec­tive, when you get a seam per­fect, it’s just beau­ti­ful,” she said.

Ms White, whose day job is at Mur­ray’s Art and Fram­ing, said she en­joyed work­ing with gor­geous tex­tiles such as silk and be­ing able to tai­lor a gar­ment to an in­di­vid­ual.

She said she was able to draw pat­terns and in­spi­ra­tion from an archive of Vic­to­rian Corsetry in the United King­dom that had more than 50 years of pat­terns.

Ms White is one of five stu­dents ac­cepted into the QUT Cre­ative En­ter­prise Aus­tralia 2017 Fash­ion Ac­cel­er­a­tor pro­gram.

The in­ten­sive ac­cel­er­a­tor men­tors as­pir­ing fash­ion start-ups and en­trepreneurs,

❝From a tech­ni­cal per­spec­tive, when you get a seam per­fect, it’s just beau­ti­ful.

giv­ing them ac­cess to a wealth of knowl­edge and busi­ness ex­pe­ri­ence from real-world in­dus­try men­tors.

Grad­u­ates of the 2016 pro­gram pitched their busi­ness mod­els and col­lec­tions to a panel that in­cluded global re­tail ad­vi­sor and for­mer David Jones chief ex­ec­u­tive of­fi­cer Paul Zahra and Vogue Aus­tralia editor-in-chief Ed­wina McCann.

Ms White started the pro­gram last month and she spends a day in Bris­bane each week, learn­ing new skills and mak­ing gar­ments.

At the end of the six-month pro­gram, Ms White will show­case six out­fits dur­ing Bris­bane Fash­ion Month.

“It’s very in­ter­est­ing. I’ve learnt so much al­ready,” she said.

She said she was find­ing the busi­ness side of things par­tic­u­larly help­ful.

One of Lor­raine White’s cre­ations at the Burnie Pa­per on Skin ex­hi­bi­tion in 2016.

PHO­TOS: CONTRIBUTED

TOOWOOMBA FASH­ION­ISTA: White­lane Tex­tiles owner Lor­raine White was ac­cepted into the QUT Cre­ative En­ter­prise Aus­tralia 2017 Fash­ion Ac­cel­er­a­tor pro­gram.

Lor­raine White’s corset was pho­tographed on a model by Matt Hickey Pho­tog­ra­phy.

Lor­raine White’s cre­ation from the Burnie Pa­per on Skin ex­hi­bi­tion in 2016.

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