CAN YOU OPEN THE RIGHT DOOR FOR SOME­ONE NEAR YOU?

YOU MAY THINK THAT MOST OLD DOGS KNOW ENOUGH TRICKS AL­READY, BUT THIS AR­TI­CLE ABOUT TRADE TRAIN­ING IS AIMED AT THE PUPS IN YOUR FAM­ILY OR NEIGH­BOUR­HOOD

The Shed - - Trade Training At Sit -

This is your op­por­tu­nity to con­nect some­one who may have a hid­den tal­ent for a trade with a re­ward­ing ca­reer and a grate­ful in­dus­try!

In the good old days, kids who had an ap­ti­tude for trades or tech­ni­cal sub­jects would dis­cover this at school in wood­work, me­tal­work, tech draw­ing, and the like. They would then move into ap­pren­tice­ships.

While there’s a move to clear that path again, many trades to­day are cry­ing out for new en­trants. The prob­lem is that many more young­sters have had a non-stop diet of aca­demic study so they may have no idea they could have great hand skills and a promis­ing ca­reer in a trade. It’s up to us to spot that tal­ent and steer them in the right di­rec­tion.

One of the best direc­tions to steer them is to the South­ern In­sti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy (SIT) in In­ver­cargill. It of­fers a wide range of trades pro­grammes that give grad­u­ates the skills and knowl­edge in­dus­try is look­ing for. The cour­ses com­bine class­room learn­ing with prac­ti­cal work and em­ployer­based work ex­pe­ri­ence.

Stu­dents in the Trades and Tech­nol­ogy Fac­ulty work in a $5.5 mil­lion state-of-theart fa­cil­ity that boasts four fully-equipped work­shops. Lead­ing-edge equip­ment in­cludes a 3D prin­ter and scan­ner, wa­ter­jet cut­ter, vir­tual welder, and CNC lathe.

Con­struc­tion stu­dents get hands-on ex­pe­ri­ence build­ing a three-bed­room trans­portable house — great work ex­pe­ri­ence for a build­ing ap­pren­tice­ship.

If you know some­one who is good at draw­ing, prob­lem solv­ing, and struc­ture, and has good re­sults in de­sign or math­e­mat­ics or sim­i­lar, a ca­reer in ar­chi­tec­tural tech­nol­ogy or quan­tity sur­vey­ing could be for them.

Ar­chi­tec­tural tech­nol­ogy stu­dents learn the prin­ci­ples of build­ing de­sign through draw­ing, com­puter-aided de­sign, and mod­el­ling. They work in a de­sign and con­struc­tion team turn­ing those con­cepts into re­al­ity, pre­par­ing a de­sign brief, pre­lim­i­nary de­signs, and work­ing draw­ings.

Quan­tity sur­vey­ing is a ter­rific life skill as well as a great ca­reer. Stu­dents learn how to es­ti­mate ma­te­ri­als, cost projects, com­mu­ni­cate with clients, and col­lab­o­rate with en­gi­neers, ar­chi­tects, and all the trades in­volved in a build­ing project. They will be set to en­ter the workforce with ex­pe­ri­ence in SIT’s de­sign suite of 30 sta­tions run­ning Au­toCAD, In­ven­tor, ArchiCAD, as well as man­ual draw­ing sta­tions.

Choos­ing to study for a New Zealand Diploma in Civil or Me­chan­i­cal En­gi­neer­ing is a path to many dif­fer­ent ca­reers in a high-de­mand sec­tor. Civil en­gi­neer­ing can in­volve work­ing in the mas­sive util­i­ties, con­struc­tion, ma­te­ri­als and lo­gis­tics in­dus­tries, and me­chan­i­cal en­gi­neers de­sign, make and main­tain the tools, en­gines, ma­chines, and sys­tems that keep mod­ern so­ci­ety oper­at­ing.

Fol­low­ing on from these two diplo­mas, SIT is on track to run a new de­gree course, the Bach­e­lor of En­gi­neer­ing Tech­nol­ogy (sub­ject to ac­cred­i­ta­tion and ap­proval by NZQA and En­gi­neer­ing NZ) with ma­jors in both civil en­gi­neer­ing and me­chan­i­cal en­gi­neer­ing. It is fore­cast to start in early 2019. Places are lim­ited, so talk to your ta­lented young­sters now and help them launch their fu­tures with SIT!

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