NINE LIVES

IT’S ONE THING TO RE­VIVE A CAR, BUT QUITE ANOTHER TO GO DOWN THE RAB­BIT HOLE OF A CON­COURS RESTO

Unique Cars - - GARAGE GURUS -

This was a bit of an un­usual ex­er­cise for me.

I’m a tool­maker by trade and my two pre­vi­ous restora­tions (the 56 Chev Bel Air and C1 Corvette we fea­tured last year - Ed) were very much hands-on. How­ever a crit­i­cal de­ci­sion fairly early on with this car changed the whole course of events.

Let me roll back a bit. One of the de­ci­sions I faced with the E-type was how high a stan­dard should I shoot for. Th­ese things are in big de­mand in­ter­na­tion­ally and they’re worth a lot of money if they’re done right. So you can’t just go and pick one up for 60 grand, give it a lick and a prom­ise and ex­pect it to fetch top dol­lar.

I’ve been watch­ing prices for the last four years or so and the rises have been alarm­ing. I’m a car nut and I’m not wealthy, but you’re see­ing E-types that were an ab­so­lute pile of crap sell­ing for $20,000 four years ago in the USA, go­ing for more like $50,000 now. And that’s be­fore you fix them – all you’re re­ally buying is VIN plates

This one is a 1967 Se­ries 1 4.2. That means it’s run­ning the 4.2 litre straight six and, in this case is still run­ning the com­plete orig­i­nal drive train: en­gine, gearbox and diff.

In some ways for me, it closes a long cir­cle. When I was in my 20s (I’m now 66), I was work­ing as a tool­maker for

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