Amalfi

VOGUE Living Australia - - Concierge - hotel­loscoglio.com

Our son Hunter was so spell­bound when he woke up in Posi­tano on his first trip to the Amalfi Coast, he went out onto the bal­cony and started scream­ing with joy. He still talks about it ev­ery day. Yes it can be busy and crowded but you can’t over­look the beauty, espe­cially from the wa­ter look­ing back to that view: the cas­cade of houses, the patina of sun-bleached colours… I al­ways think of it as be­ing frozen in time. be­low, from left: One of the most mag­i­cal places to stay on the Amalfi Coast is Casa Pri­vata, in the vil­lage of Pra­iano. Orig­i­nally a fish­er­man’s cottage, it’s been painstak­ingly re­stored and is now a bou­tique ho­tel with its own pri­vate cliff for sun­bathing and a lad­der down to the ocean for swim­ming. op­po­site page: view of the Amalfi coast; cas­apri­vata.it

SKIP­PER YOUR OWN BOAT TO LUNCH

I’m all about get­ting out in the wilder­ness, rent­ing a Vespa, a vin­tage con­vert­ible or a boat and just see­ing things from dif­fer­ent per­spec­tives. Trav­el­ling then ap­peals to your senses on dif­fer­ent lev­els, espe­cially in a boat, which in Amalfi is a re­ally easy way to get around. I’ve got my own boat li­cence so we spent a lot of time on the wa­ter, but if I were to have a few drinks I’d get a skip­per with one of the older wooden boats. My most en­dur­ing mem­o­ries are the sea jour­neys back from Ner­ano to Posi­tano af­ter lunch at our favourite restau­rant, Lo Scoglio. The sun is set­ting, there’s the scent of pine and ocean and the sound of the boat’s diesel en­gine, which gen­tly lulls you to sleep as you me­an­der along the coast­line.

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