PACK­ING FOR A WEEK­END OF TRAIL RUN­NING

Canadian Running - - PLACES -

A// ARC' TERYX NORVAN V1

These are my go-to trail shoes, they of­fer great pro­tec­tion from loose rock, and they climb in­cred­i­bly well.

B// ARC' TERYX INCENDO

This jacket is very light­weight, packs down to essen­tially noth­ing, which makes it a per­fect jacket to al­ways leave in my bag.

C// OSPREY REV 6

On any ad­ven­ture in the moun­tains, you should have a small back­pack with just enough room for you to carry the nec­es­sary food (plus a half-day ex­tra), and your moun­tain run­ning kit.

D// ARC'TERYX ACCELERO COMP SS

I highly rec­om­mend a good, light­weight, breath­able T-shirt on long days in the moun­tains. Be sure to have a syn­thetic fab­ric so that any mois­ture will evap­o­rate quickly.

E// BIVY SACK

You never re­ally plan to spend a night in the moun­tains, but if you get stuck out there for the night, this will make that night sur­viv­able. I rec­om­mend get­ting an emer­gency bivy sack with re­flec­tive ma­te­rial on the in­side to help keep you warm.

F// WILDLIFE HORN

Whether it’s a horn, bear spray, or a banger, hav­ing some sort of wildlife de­ter­rent in the moun­tains is key. Al­ways make sure it is in a place that’s easy to ac­cess, not in your back­pack.

G// SONY A6500 WITH A 10-18 F/4 LENS

Rel­a­tively com­pact and light­weight, but the qual­ity of the im­ages and over­all cam­era per­for­mance makes this my go-to run­ning cam­era.

H// ARC'TERYX SOLEUS SHORT

I’ve had these shorts for a while now, and they are my go-to for long days in the moun­tains. They have an in­te­grated pocket sys­tem in the back that al­lows me to carry gels, wa­ter and other es­sen­tials.

I// SPOT

A good GPS satel­lite de­vice is one of the most im­por­tant things to have. When you’re in the moun­tains with no cell ser­vice, this is your way to con­tact search and res­cue, or your loved ones if needed.

J// MAP & COM­PASS

Nav­i­ga­tion in the moun­tains is in­cred­i­bly im­por­tant: you should know where you’re go­ing, and if you get lost, know how to find your way back. Also, my com­pass has a whis­tle on the end of it.

K// LEATHERMAN SKELETOOL

A multi-tool that can do as much as pos­si­ble is worth its weight in gold.

L// LIGHTER

I bring both a lighter and a fire starter when I’m in the moun­tains.

M// SU­UNTO AMBIT2

A good GPS watch is es­sen­tial. You can pre-load maps into it, and track your over­all dis­tance and el­e­va­tion gain, which makes nav­i­ga­tion much eas­ier.

N// PETROLEUM JELLY

You won’t al­ways need this… but when you do, you’ll be thank­ful you car­ried it.

O// GLOVE LIN­ERS

A lit­tle “ex­tra” I like to bring. As a pho­tog­ra­pher, I’ll of­ten stop run­ning in the alpine to shoot im­ages from time to time, and that usu­ally means cold hands. So for me, these help make that process a bit more en­joy­able.

P// DUCT TAPE

This doesn’t have one par­tic­u­lar use, but it can help you with pretty much any­thing. Whether it’s ripped cloth­ing or first-aid, the uses are pretty much end­less.

Q// FIRE STARTER

If my lighter fails me or runs out of gas, then I bring out the fire starter. Count­less times lighters have failed me, so I al­ways have this as a backup.

R// SUNSCREEN

Run­ning in the moun­tains of­ten in­cludes a lot of time in the alpine, or even in snowy con­di­tions. Mak­ing sure your skin is prop­erly pro­tected can make or break a day.

S// FIRST-AID KIT

Whether you build your own or buy one from a store, make sure you also ed­u­cate your­self with a wilder­ness first-aid course. The more you know, the less you need.

T// HEADLAMP

I can’t even count how many times I’ve ended up in the moun­tains af­ter dark, with­out a headlamp, us­ing the flash­light from my iPhone. Whether you’re plan­ning to stay out in the dark or not, a headlamp should al­ways be in your bag.

U// LU­L­ULE­MON RUN­NING SOCK

It’s syn­thetic, thin and has a very tight fit, mak­ing it a great sock on the trails.

Wil­cox Pass

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