STILL DIG­GING OUT?

An­other nor’easter ex­pected to drop more snow on Cape Breton

Cape Breton Post - - FRONT PAGE - BY DAVID JALA david.jala@cb­post.com

Bet­ter hurry — there’s an­other nor’easter on the way.

Af­ter a brief re­prieve, Cape Breton braced for yet an­other snow-laden nor’easter that is ex­pected to bring even more snow to the is­land to­day.

The lat­est weather event comes less than two days af­ter a to­tal of 72.1 cm of snow fell at Syd­ney’s Dou­glas J.A. McCurdy Air­port dur­ing the storm that hit the area on Mon­day and con­tin­ued through Tues­day.

Ac­cord­ing to a spe­cial weather state­ment is­sued Wed­nes­day af­ter­noon by En­vi­ron­ment Canada, a low-pres­sure sys­tem that de­vel­oped in the Gulf of Maine was fore­cast to move over parts of Nova Sco­tia be­fore spread­ing to Cape Breton overnight. The storm will see snow be­com­ing mixed with ice pel­lets be­fore turn­ing to rain which, in turn, will ta­per off into flur­ries as tem­per­a­tures dip be­low freez­ing this af­ter­noon.

Snow­fall amounts of 10-15 cm are pre­dicted for Cape Breton along with high winds that will re­sult in re­duced vis­i­bil­ity.

Linda Libby, a Char­lot­te­town-based me­te­o­rol­o­gist with En­vi­ron­ment Canada, says the so-called nor’east­ers have the po­ten­tial to be­come very po­tent. And, she says that has a lot to do with the ge­og­ra­phy of the At­lantic prov­inces.

“One of the things that helps storms in­ten­sify is warm, moist air and we have the Gulf Stream run­ning up the east coast of the United States and south of Nova

“But for Cape Breton, this storm is ex­pected to have more mixed pre­cip­i­ta­tion and it’s not sup­posed to be as long a storm be­cause it’s mov­ing a bit faster al­though it could slow down a bit when it hits the Gulf of St. Lawrence.” Linda Libby, me­te­o­rol­o­gist, En­vi­ron­ment Canada

Sco­tia, so that pro­vides an ex­tra boost of en­ergy for storms that track in that di­rec­tion,” said Libby, adding that heavy snows are al­ways a pos­si­bil­ity when a nor’easter strikes at this time of year.

“But for Cape Breton, this storm is ex­pected to have more mixed pre­cip­i­ta­tion and it’s not sup­posed to be as long a storm be­cause it’s mov­ing a bit faster al­though it could slow down a bit when it hits the Gulf of St. Lawrence.”

On Wed­nes­day, many Cape Breton res­i­dents pre­pared for the new storm by clear­ing away as much snow as pos­si­ble. How­ever, with street-side snow­banks be­com­ing higher and higher, snow re­moval is be­com­ing more prob­lem­atic.

At Syd­ney’s Prince Street Shop­ping Cen­tre, gi­ant moun­tains of snow cov­ered large por­tions of the park­ing lot.

Mean­while, most area busi­nesses re­opened on Wed­nes­day af­ter be­ing closed for ei­ther part or all of the pre­vi­ous day as Cape Breton dug out from the huge snow­fall. And, Canada Post mail de­liv­er­ers were back on their routes af­ter the Crown cor­po­ra­tion is­sued a rare Red Alert on Tues­day when it was de­ter­mined that it was too dan­ger­ous for the work­ers to per­form their du­ties.

DAVID JALA/CAPE BRETON POST PHO­TOS

Snow re­moval crews were still out in force on Wed­nes­day, 24 hours af­ter a nor’easter de­posited more than 70 cm of snow in Cape Breton from Mon­day af­ter­noon through Tues­day morn­ing. In the above pic­ture, an equip­ment operator clears the side­walk along­side Syd­ney’s Went­worth Park.

Moun­tains of snow, such as this one in the Syd­ney Shop­ping Cen­tre park­ing lot, are com­mon sights across Cape Breton fol­low­ing the nor’easter that dumped some 70 cm of snow on the area on Mon­day and Tues­day. And, the piles are ex­pected to be big­ger to­day af­ter yet an­other low-pres­sure sys­tem works its way into the area.

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