SAVAGES

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SAVAGES Adore Life

Savages be­gan as some­thing of an enigma. Staunch in their views and metic­u­lous about their vi­sion, they quickly po­si­tioned them­selves as a se­ri­ous band with a lot to say. Dur­ing the record­ing of Adore Life, the band’s front­woman, Jehnny Beth, stated that this al­bum would be the so­lu­tion to the prob­lems doc­u­mented on their de­but LP, Si­lence Your­self. While Adore Life doesn’t quite pro­vide those an­swers, the record’s great­ness lies in its in­tense, am­bi­tious ex­plo­ration. Com­pared to its fore­bear, the warmer, looser sound of Adore Life is the work of a band that’s more re­laxed, more com­fort­able in their skin. Still, it would be fool­ish to mis­con­strue this tem­per­ance for soft­ness. Tracks like “Adore” and “Me­chan­ics” are epic med­i­ta­tions that bub­ble and swell with quiet fe­roc­ity, show­ing res­o­lute ma­tu­rity and re­straint, even in anger. They func­tion as care­fully placed pe­ri­ods of re­flec­tion for the lis­tener amidst the al­bum’s more ki­netic cuts, like blis­ter­ing al­bum opener, “The An­swer” and the dance-y, beat-driven “Evil” and “Sur­ren­der.” Mostly, the al­bum’s ex­plo­ration of love is mean­ing­ful, but vague tracks like “T.I.W.Y.G.” and “Slow­ing Down the World” some­times fail to push the in­ves­ti­ga­tion as far as they should. Adore Life is a def­i­nite pro­gres­sion for Savages that man­ages to main­tain the feral bark that made Si­lence Your­self so spe­cial. With this al­bum, they’ve proven that they’re a band with sub­stance, stay­ing power and the abil­ity to ques­tion ev­ery­thing — and that’s worth a lot. (Mata­dor, mata­dor­records.com)

HOW WAS THE RECORD­ING PROCESS DIF­FER­ENT THIS TIME?

Beth: The first record, we wanted to record live and use the record­ing as a doc­u­ment of how we were at the time, For the se­cond record, we wanted a dif­fer­ent ap­proach — why would you do some­thing twice? We also put all our trust in our pro­ducer Johnny Hos­tile; we felt very com­fort­able work­ing with him [and] there was a dy­namic that was dif­fer­ent from the first one.

THE SONG “ADORE” WAS IN­SPIRED BY THE AC­TIVIST PO­ETRY OF MIN­NIE BRUCE PRATT. DO YOU OF­TEN DRAW IN­SPI­RA­TION FROM OTHER ART FORMS?

Some­times we don’t re­al­ize how much dif­fer­ent arts are con­nected; the idea that po­etry could in­flu­ence painters for ex­am­ple. There’s a whole new field to plunge into and dis­cover once you un­der­stood one. I al­ways en­joy mak­ing con­nec­tions be­tween artists.

WHAT DO YOU THINK WHEN LIS­TEN­ERS QUES­TION YOUR ORIG­I­NAL­ITY, AND AS­SIGN YOU TO MOVE­MENTS LIKE POST-PUNK RE­VIVAL?

You can re­fer to the past and by in­spired by the past, as much as the present and the fu­ture, there’s no right or wrong way of do­ing it. I don’t be­lieve that you start a band be­cause you want to play like Wire or the Cure. You start a band be­cause you have some­thing to say. BEN CAR­NEY

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