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JA­SON COL­LETT Song and Dance Man

Ja­son Col­lett’s new LP, Song and Dance Man, has such a thor­oughly anachro­nis­tic feel to it that it’s jar­ring to hear the for­mer Bro­ken So­cial Scene man sing about SXSW and tweet­ing on it. Part of that vin­tage ve­neer can be at­trib­uted to pro­ducer Afie Jur­va­nen (Ba­hamas) — who also of­fers up warm, sticky-fin­gered bass here — but that by­gone aes­thetic is also rooted in Col­lett’s writ­ing and, even more so, his per­form­ing. Tracks like “Long Day’s Shadow” have groan­ing gui­tar work and breezy vo­cals that evoke Ge­orge Har­ri­son at his most wist­ful, while the lum­ber­ing rhythm sec­tion of “Black Oak Sa­vanna” owes a debt to CCR. Then there’s the ti­tle track, on which Col­lett’s sly vo­cal swag­ger evokes a youth­ful Tom Petty, as the punchy drum and bass echo a long lost Wings B-side. “Where Did Our Love Go?” starts with pit­ter-pat­ter drums and gui­tar strum­ming that re­side squarely at the in­ter­sec­tion of E Street and As­bury Park. On it, Col­lett ad­dresses the ’70s head on, be­fore lament­ing lost love and sex. The ti­tle track, mean­while, is a fierce cri­tique of a mod­ern mu­sic in­dus­try that marginal­izes its tal­ent. By pay­ing joy­ous mu­si­cal homage to the ’70s greats while also singing about what we ought to re­claim from that by­gone era, Ja­son Col­lett has given Song and Dance Man a qual­ity that’s both timely and time­less. (Arts and Crafts, arts- crafts.ca)

WHAT WAS IT LIKE TO HAVE JUR­VA­NEN PRO­DUCE THIS RECORD?

Him go­ing from be­ing a gui­tar player in my band to ac­tu­ally be­ing in the driver’s seat and telling me what to do was a lot of fun. He’s re­ally come into his own, and his tal­ent is im­mense. I’m proud of what he’s do­ing on my record, in a fa­mil­ial way.

ZEUS ARE TOUR­ING AS YOUR BACK­ING BAND, AND YOU SEEM TO HAVE A VERY STRONG CON­NEC­TION WITH ALL OF THEM.

Yeah, Afie in­tro­duced me to the other fellows he was play­ing with at the time, who went on to be­come Zeus, and he con­vinced me they should be my backup band for tour­ing Idols. Those tours we did, and the sub­se­quent record we did to­gether, were a big part of my last ten years. So when I did my 2010 al­bum Rat a Tat Tat, Zeus pro­duced that col­lec­tively. Afie has been some­one I’ve wanted to work with in that con­text, be­cause he’s got such a unique spin on things. KYLE MULLIN

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