DIY EAT: Bone Broth Recipe For Dogs

Easy and eco­nom­i­cal to make, bone broth is su­per-healthy, rich in pro­tein, and loved by dogs. Here’s how to make it.

Modern Dog - - CONTENTS - BY ROSE FROSEK

Make this easy, af­ford­able, and deeply nu­tri­tious bone broth for your dog.

Bone Broth is a ter­rific thing to give your dog, whether you give it on its own (great for un­der-the-weather dogs) or added it to your dog’s usual din­ner to perk things up a bit. Easy and eco­nom­i­cal to make, bone broth is nutri­ent-dense, in­cred­i­bly rich in pro­tein—es­pe­cially gelatin—and has a sooth­ing, de­li­cious taste dogs love. It’s also won­der­ful for joint and di­ges­tive health and is detox­i­fy­ing. What’s not to love? To get started, you’ll want to choose beef mar­row bones and bones that have a lot of joints, such as chicken or turkey legs. (Ask your butcher for bones or save the bones from Sun­day din­ner in the freezer un­til you’re ready to make a broth. Bone broths are gen­er­ally made with bones with a small amount of meat left cling­ing to them.) You can roast the bones first to im­prove the flavour, though it's not nec­es­sary. Roast them if you’re mak­ing broth for your­self, too, oth­er­wise keep it sim­ple—just throw the bones in the soup pot or crock pot and get ready to get cookin’! Next, cover the bones with two to three inches of wa­ter (add a cou­ple ta­ble­spoons of ap­ple cider vine­gar if you wish; it helps to ex­tract the min­er­als in the bones) and then sim­mer your bone broth for a long time—be pre­pared to sim­mer for eight to over 24 hours. The goal is to pro­duce gelatin from the col­la­gen­rich joints and to re­lease trace min­er­als like cal­cium. At the end of the cook­ing time, the bones should be soft and slightly crumbly when pressed be­tween your fin­gers. Re­move the bones and dis­card—don’t give your dog cooked bones as they can splin­ter and dam­age the in­tes­tine. Now place the broth in the fridge to cool. After a cou­ple of hours, a layer of fat will have col­lected on the top—scoop this off and dis­card. The re­main­ing broth, jelly-like and de­li­cious, is ready to be served to your dog! Spoon into smaller con­tain­ers to store. The broth will keep in the fridge for up to three days. Freeze what­ever you won’t use in this time pe­riod. And pre­pare your­self for a very en­thu­si­as­tic din­ner re­cep­tion!

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