SHOULD I AC­TU­ALLY USE ALL THE FEA­TURES ON MY WATCH? FOR EX­AM­PLE: IS IT A BAD IDEA TO KEEP THE CHRONO­GRAPH FUNC­TION RUN­NING?

Sharp - - SHARP WATCH - By Ash El­wood

As we all well know by now, con­tem­po­rary tech­nolo­gies vastly out­per­form our me­chan­i­cal watch’s ca­pa­bil­i­ties — it’s why po­lice of­fi­cers use radar in­stead of a stop­watch and arith­metic. But while the skill and pa­tience in­volved in tim­ing the speed of a race car with a chrono func­tion is un­think­ably bur­den­some for most, and de­ter­min­ing the dis­tance of an en­emy’s ar­tillery is hope­fully a sit­u­a­tion in which none of us will find our­selves in (both orig­i­nal uses for the chrono­graph fea­ture), chrono­graph watches are some of the most cel­e­brated, sought af­ter, and down­right beau­ti­ful watches avail­able. Even if we don’t use them to their full po­ten­tial, that full po­ten­tial is a me­chan­i­cal mar­vel that fits neatly on your wrist.

As with other func­tions your watch can do, you should nei­ther ne­glect nor overuse your chrono­graph. Once a week or so, take your chrono func­tion out for a spin (maybe time your son as he fetches you a drink; kids love be­ing timed as much as they love ama­teur bar­tend­ing). The lu­bri­ca­tion be­tween cer­tain mov­ing parts func­tions best and lasts longer when ac­ti­vated, but leav­ing it run­ning in­def­i­nitely steals en­ergy from your watch’s main func­tion, and there­fore re­duces your watches power re­serve, thereby throw­ing off its pre­ci­sion.

YOUR QUES­TIONS, EX­PERTLY AN­SWERED

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