Singing CETA’s praises

Trudeau and Ir­ish Taoiseach tout ben­e­fits of trade agree­ment at Dublin meet­ings

The Guardian (Charlottetown) - - BUSINESS -

Prime Min­is­ter Justin Trudeau and his Ir­ish coun­ter­part reaf­firmed their com­mit­ment to the Canada-EU trade pact known as CETA dur­ing their meet­ing Tues­day in Dublin.

Speak­ing to re­porters fol­low­ing their meet­ing, both Trudeau and Taoiseach Leo Varad­kar sang the praises of CETA as a com­mit­ment to free trade and a pact which will ben­e­fit both sides.

Trudeau re­it­er­ated his theme that CETA will de­liver stronger eco­nomic growth and cre­ate more well-paid jobs on both sides of the At­lantic.

“CETA will give Cana­dian and Ir­ish busi­nesses greater ac­cess to each other’s mar­kets,” Trudeau said. “It will de­liver stronger eco­nomic growth, the kind of growth that ben­e­fits all ci­ti­zens, not just the wealth­i­est.”

Trade be­tween Canada and Ire­land to­talled about $2.4 bil­lion in 2016, but both coun­tries want the agree­ment to work — Canada views it as a hedge against U.S. pro­tec­tion­ism, and Ire­land as a hedge against an un­cer­tain post-Brexit fu­ture.

“Most im­por­tant, it will cre­ate more good, well-pay­ing jobs for work­ers on both sides of the At­lantic,” Trudeau said.

Varad­kar said while Canada is very large and Ire­land is small, both coun­tries have many sim­i­lar­i­ties, no­tably by hav­ing large neigh­bours “go­ing in dif­fer­ent di­rec­tions for the time be­ing” re­fer­ring to the U.S. pro­tec­tion­ist path and Bri­tain’s di­vorce

“Cana­di­ans and Ir­ish alike un­der­stand that it is not enough to tol­er­ate our neigh­bours, we need to em­brace the things that make each of us unique whether it’s our gen­der, the lan­guage we speak at home, where we wor­ship or whom we love.” Prime Min­is­ter Justin Trudeau

talks with the EU.

Both also touted their views about in­clu­sive­ness.

“Cana­di­ans and Ir­ish alike un­der­stand that it is not enough to tol­er­ate our neigh­bours, we need to em­brace the things that make each of us unique whether it’s our gen­der, the lan­guage we speak at home, where we wor­ship or whom we love,” Trudeau said.

Trudeau and Varad­kar also spoke of their com­mit­ment to cli­mate change, di­ver­sity and the need for greater gen­der bal­ance in gov­ern­ments.

Varad­kar joked that he re­ceived good ad­vice from Trudeau dur­ing their meet­ing since he’s been in of­fice about 18 days while Trudeau has held of­fice for about 18 months. Trudeau is the Ir­ish leader’s first in­ter­na­tional vis­i­tor and this was their first face-to-face meet­ing.

Trudeau will later head to Scot­land to meet with Queen El­iz­a­beth be­fore go­ing to Ham­burg, Ger­many for the G20 sum­mit. That gath­er­ing on Fri­day is shap­ing up as a show­down be­tween Ger­man Chan­cel­lor An­gela Merkel and U.S. Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump over the is­sues of iso­la­tion­ism and pro­tec­tion­ism.

CP PHOTO

Prime Min­is­ter Justin Trudeau, left, speaks to the me­dia as Ir­ish Taoiseach Leo Varad­kar looks on at Farm­leigh House on Tues­day in Dublin.

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