Skier lauds new brain in­jury treat­ment tech­nique

The Hamilton Spectator - - SPORTS -

VAN­COU­VER — A com­pet­i­tive skier from Utah is cred­it­ing a new tech­nique at Van­cou­ver Gen­eral Hos­pi­tal for a swift recovery from a brain in­jury she suf­fered in Whistler, B.C.

Jamie Crane-Mauzy was the first pa­tient in Bri­tish Columbia to un­dergo au­toreg­u­la­tion mon­i­tor­ing, a process al­low­ing doc­tors to de­ter­mine the pre­cise oxy­gen and blood pres­sure lev­els in her brain.

The 23-year-old was hos­pi­tal­ized for eight days and her fam­ily was told she might die af­ter she crashed dur­ing a dou­ble back­flip at the World Ski and Snow­board Fes­ti­val in April last year.

But two doc­tors de­cided Crane-Mauzy would be the first pa­tient for the new tech­nique just weeks af­ter they in­tro­duced the pro­gram at the hos­pi­tal with knowl­edge they ac­quired in the United King­dom.

Crit­i­cal care Dr. Don­ald Gries­dale says the tech­nol­ogy can help pa­tients leave the in­ten­sive care unit sooner and give them a bet­ter chance at re­cov­er­ing to the point of liv­ing in­de­pen­dently. An­other 36 pa­tients have been treated with au­toreg­u­la­tion mon­i­tor­ing since CraneMauzy, and Gries­dale says 60 per cent of those have had favourable out­comes.

DAR­RYL DYCK, THE CANA­DIAN PRESS

U.S. slopestyle skier Jamie Crane-Mauzy, of Park City, Utah,who suf­fereda se­vere trau­matic brain in­jury dur­ing a com­pe­ti­tion in Whistler last year, re­acts while watch­ing a videoof her recovery, dur­ing a news con­fer­ence atVan­cou­ver Gen­er­alHospi­tal.

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