BIZ BUZZ

The Hamilton Spectator - - BUSINESS - Email Natalie: npad­don@thes­pec.com 905-526-2420 | @NatatTheSpec With files from Kael Doomernik

Mov­ing on

Mart­i­nus Ge­leynse has kissed good­bye the mag­a­zine he be­gan pub­lish­ing six years ago.

Ur­ban­ic­ity Mag­a­zine — part of Ur­ban­ic­ity Om­n­i­me­dia — was re­cently sold, along­side some of his other ad­ver­tis­ing prop­er­ties, he says, al­though he re­mains a part of the mag­a­zine’s ad­vi­sory board.

Sell­ing the mag­a­zine was part of a “nat­u­ral evo­lu­tion,” he adds.

“The city has changed so much” since the mag­a­zine’s launch in 2010, he says, point­ing to the sta­dium de­bate and Su­per­crawl’s emer­gence at the time.

The goal then was to cre­ate an “ur­ban con­ver­sa­tion piece.”

“At the time, down­town … felt like a cause. It was in rough shape and ev­ery­one was start­ing to do stuff to bring it back.”

Since the city has mor­phed, so too must his com­pany, he notes.

“I don’t see Hamil­ton as a cause any­more. Now, Hamil­ton is a thriv­ing, won­der­ful place to live. For us, we needed to also be in a dif­fer­ent place.”

The In­ter­cep­tor

A Hamil­ton en­tre­pre­neur who cre­ated a neck guard to pro­tect hockey play­ers against slic­ing and im­pacts from a puck or stick now is sell­ing his prod­uct in a lo­cal store.

Joe Camillo’s In­ter­cep­tor — made with a soft, rub­ber­like sub­stance from Bri­tish com­pany D30 that so­lid­i­fies in­stantly when hit — was de­liv­ered to Stoney Creek’s Pro Hockey Life in March. About 4,000 of the light­weight guards have been sold across Canada, the United States and Europe since the prod­uct launched in Jan­uary 2016.

Camillo has also de­vel­oped wrist guards and neck guards for goalies.

Hi­jab-friendly sa­lon

Laila Nawabi, owner of Laila’s Hair De­sign at 1401 Plains Rd. E. in Burling­ton, has made her shop hi­jab-friendly for women.

In Is­lamic cul­ture, it is for­bid­den for a woman’s hair to be seen by a man who is not her hus­band or other fam­ily mem­ber. This can make get­ting a hair­cut more dif­fi­cult.

Nawabi’s sa­lon space is equipped with blinds on ex­te­rior win­dows, and a mov­able room di­vider in­side. An even more pri­vate, self-con­tained hairstyling room is also avail­able. She also tries to book 10 min­utes be­tween all ap­point­ments so it’s just her and her client in the sa­lon.

“All of my clients, no mat­ter who they are, want pri­vacy. If you are dye­ing your hair, you don’t want peo­ple sit­ting be­side, star­ing at you when your hair is a mess,” she ex­plains.

Nawabi is hope­ful that her idea will take off.

“If peo­ple like it, then I might do one night where we close all the blinds. And we can do one night where it’s just for Mus­lim women.”

Life sci­ence com­pe­ti­tion

A lo­cal com­pany that de­vel­oped a sys­tem to speed up the de­tec­tion of E. coli bac­te­ria and other pathogens in recre­ational wa­ter sup­plies took home the grand prize at a re­cent life sci­ence in­no­va­tion com­pe­ti­tion.

In­novoGENE won $25,000 in cash and $10,000 worth of other prizes from the fourth an­nual Sy­napse Life Sci­ence Com­pe­ti­tion when its fi­nal show­case was held at McMaster In­no­va­tion Park last month. The com­pe­ti­tion is de­signed to move prod­ucts and ser­vices out of labs and into the mar­ket.

“The work we have done dur­ing the com­pe­ti­tion is so im­por­tant for our busi­ness,” co-founder Kha Tram said in a me­dia re­lease.

While cur­rent wa­ter test­ing meth­ods can be costly and re­quire be­tween one and three days to work, In­novoGENE’s sys­tem cuts test­ing time down to one hour.

The com­pe­ti­tion’s run­ners-up in­cluded Health­care In­no­va­tion in Neu­roTech­nol­ogy (HiNT) in sec­ond place and 20/20 Op­ti­mEyes, which was a big win­ner at a re­cent Forge@Mac Stu­dent Startup Com­pe­ti­tion, in third place.

Era Di­a­betes won the poster prize of $1,500 in cash.

In to­tal, 10 teams com­peted for nearly $60,000 in cash prizes and pro­fes­sional re­sources.

KAEL DOOMERNIK, SPE­CIAL TO THE HAMIL­TON SPEC­TA­TOR

Laila Nawabi, owner of Laila’s Hair De­sign on Plains Road East in Burling­ton, has made her shop hi­jab-friendly for Mus­lim women.

HAMIL­TON SPEC­TA­TOR FILE PHOTO

Joe Camillo’s In­ter­cep­tor — made with a soft, rub­ber­like sub­stance from Bri­tish com­pany D30 that so­lid­i­fies in­stantly when hit — was de­liv­ered to Stoney Creek’s Pro Hockey Life in March.

HAMIL­TON SPEC­TA­TOR FILE PHOTO

Mart­i­nus Ge­leynse has sold Ur­ban­ic­ity Mag­a­zine, which he started six years ago.

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