How can fried rice be good for you?

It feels like an in­dul­gence but this dish is ac­tu­ally good for you

The Hamilton Spectator - - FOOD - EL­LIE KRIEGER

This recipe turns a hum­ble bowl of rice into a lip-smack­ingly tasty meal.

It feels like an in­dul­gence, but the dish is ac­tu­ally good for you.

The bowl is brim­ming with colour­ful spring veg­eta­bles — as­para­gus, peas and car­rots — that are stir-fried with scal­lion, gin­ger, gar­lic and a pinch of crushed red pep­per flakes. The aroma gets your mouth wa­ter­ing the sec­ond those flavours hit the skil­let. Then you add the rice and con­tinue to cook un­til it is all warmed through.

This recipe calls for brown rice be­cause it is the most ac­ces­si­ble whole-grain va­ri­ety, but black or red rice would also be de­li­cious and make for an in­trigu­ing twist.

What­ever type you choose, it is crit­i­cal to start with cooked rice that has been well chilled, oth­er­wise it can be­come gummy when stir­fried. Once the rice in the pan is hot you stir in savoury soy sauce, fra­grant se­same oil and se­same seeds, then serve it heaped in bowls, each crowned with a just-fried egg.

This is all done with a min­i­mal amount of oil, so the dish is flavour­ful without be­ing greasy, and ready in less than 20 min­utes.

Once you try it, I’ll bet that the next time you cook a batch of rice, you will pur­posely make ex­tra to en­sure you can make this bowl again — and soon.

GORAN KOSANOVIC, FOR THE WASH­ING­TON POST

There’s min­i­mal oil used in this savoury recipe, so the dish is flavour­ful without be­ing greasy.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.