Hamp­tons es­tate has celebrity pedi­gree

Jackie Kennedy Onas­sis spent cher­ished child­hood sum­mers here

The Hamilton Spectator - - STYLE - TROY MCMULLEN

EAST HAMP­TON, N.Y. — The 11acre prop­erty for sale along Fur­ther Lane here cuts a unique fig­ure amid the sprawl­ing es­tates that line this af­flu­ent sum­mer en­clave.

Im­mac­u­lately land­scaped, the stucco and ivy-clad res­i­dence spans more than 7,000 square feet with 10 bed­rooms, a large swim­ming pool and a sunken grass ten­nis court tucked neatly out back. If the bed­rooms in the main house aren’t enough, the prop­erty also in­cludes a two-bed­room pool house and a one-bed­room guest house.

De­spite its boun­ti­ful ameni­ties, how­ever, what may make the home’s $51.99 mil­lion price tag more palat­able to prospec­tive buy­ers is its celebrity pedi­gree. The 100-year-old house is where Jacque­line Kennedy Onas­sis spent child­hood sum­mers.

Known as Lasata, it was owned by her grand­fa­ther, John Vernou Bou­vier Jr., whose wife, Maude Sergeant, ini­tially bought the prop­erty in the newly fash­ion­able Hamp­tons in 1925. The prop­erty’s name comes from a Na­tive Amer­i­can word for “Place of Peace.”

“Each May the var­i­ous Bou­vier house­holds would move out of their Park Av­enue apart­ments for the sum­mer to East Hamp­ton,” writes historian Sarah Brad­ford in her book “Amer­ica’s Queen: The Life of Jacque­line Kennedy Onas­sis.”

“Maude would trans­plant her en­tire house­hold staff to Lasata.”

For young Jackie, and her sis­ter Lee Radzi­will, the gilded es­tate even­tu­ally be­came a cov­eted re­treat from the city. It’s where they learned to ride horse­back, with Jackie even­tu­ally be­com­ing an ac­com­plished rider and com­pet­ing at na­tional events.

At 10, Jackie was so moved by her ex­pe­ri­ence at Lasata that she wrote a poem ti­tled “Sea Joy.” In it she writes lyri­cally of her mem­o­ries of East Hamp­ton and her sum­mer home, evok­ing the sense of free­dom she felt es­cap­ing from New York at the be­gin­ning of each June.

“When I go down to the sandy shore I can think of noth­ing I want more than to live by the boom­ing blue sea,” Jackie wrote, ac­cord­ing to Brad­ford’s book.

The home’s cur­rent own­ers are fash­ion ex­ec­u­tive Reed Krakoff and his in­te­rior de­signer wife Del­phine. When the cou­ple bought Lasata in 2007, it had not been ren­o­vated in decades. With the help of Man­hat­tan ar­chi­tect Mark Fer­gu­son, they re­vamped the house and grounds with an eye to­ward main­tain­ing the orig­i­nal look and feel of the Arts and Crafts es­tate.

“Our first step was to un­der­stand, re­spect and be in­spired by the orig­i­nal de­sign vi­sion,” Fer­gu­son says. “The com­po­si­tion of the house, from its ex­te­rior sil­hou­ette to its in­te­rior mould­ing pro­files, set the lim­its and guided what was pos­si­ble.”

What couldn’t be re­stored was re­placed with pe­riod ma­te­ri­als. Plas­ter with metal lath was used in­stead of dry­wall. Dam­aged or worn orig­i­nal floor­boards were re­placed with re­claimed 200-yearold oak floor­ing to give the home a vin­tage feel.

In the liv­ing room, walls had been clad in or­nate wooden pan­elling. Yet af­ter some ren­o­va­tion work, oak pan­elling was dis­cov­ered un­der­neath, which was even­tu­ally re­stored and pre­served.

De­spite ef­forts to re­tain its pe­riod look, con­tem­po­rary touches run through­out the home.

The ground floor fea­tures a modern eat-in kitchen and break­fast nook.

A rare 1970s John Dickinson mir­ror hangs over a seat­ing area in the liv­ing room that in­cludes an 18th-cen­tury Ja­cob Frères mar­quise chair and Queen Anne wing chairs. The en­tire liv­ing room is out­fit­ted with grey stone tiling.

In the din­ing room, com­plete with built-in book­shelves, an­tique Tif­fany light fix­tures hang above a mid­cen­tury Sa­muel Marx ta­ble with Lucite legs.

“All of the first floor’s dec­o­ra­tive light­ing is vin­tage Tif­fany,” says Eileen Oneill, one of the list­ing agents on the prop­erty for Dou­glas El­li­man. “This is meant to mix the vin­tage set­ting with modern in­te­ri­ors that re­ally spread through the en­tire res­i­dence.”

Out­side of the main res­i­dence the ex­ten­sive grounds are for­mal but with a clean, con­tem­po­rary es­thetic.

Southamp­ton-based land­scape ar­chi­tect Perry Guil­lot, who is known for his work on some of the most prom­i­nent Hamp­tons es­tates, de­signed the grounds. He says he sought to dis­til the orig­i­nal lay­out into some­thing more con­tem­po­rary.

The front of the home is sur­rounded by tall, neatly groomed 100-year old lin­den and cedar trees. The for­mal gar­dens in­clude a sculp­ture by Jean Arp, which gives the set­ting the air of a stylish re­treat. Guil­lot stream­lined the plant­ings and opened up the far side of the prop­erty to cre­ate an en­try to the lawn and its ex­ten­sive col­lec­tion of plants. Long-ne­glected plant­ings were brought back to life, in­clud­ing cedar, lin­den and rhodo­den­dron.

“It was orig­i­nally a Vic­to­rian de­sign,” Guil­lot says. “But we wanted to open up the land­scape to cre­ate an en­hanced modern feel that would also re­main in step with its orig­i­nal de­sign.”

PHO­TOS COUR­TESY OF DOU­GLAS EL­LI­MAN

“Our first step was to un­der­stand, re­spect and be in­spired by the orig­i­nal de­sign vi­sion,” ar­chi­tect Mark Fer­gu­son says. “The com­po­si­tion of the house, from its ex­te­rior sil­hou­ette to its in­te­rior mold­ing pro­files, set the lim­its and guided what was pos­si­ble.”

At 10, Jackie was so moved by her ex­pe­ri­ence at Lasata that she wrote a poem ti­tled ‘Sea Joy.’ In it she writes lyri­cally of her mem­o­ries of East Hamp­ton and her sum­mer home, evok­ing the sense of free­dom she felt es­cap­ing from New York at the be­gin­ning of each June.

“When I go down to the sandy shore I can think of noth­ing I want more than to live by the boom­ing blue sea,” young Jackie wrote, ac­cord­ing to Sarah Brad­ford’s book ‘Amer­ica’s Queen: The Life of Jacque­line Kennedy Onas­sis.”

Known as Lasata, it was owned by her grand­fa­ther, John Vernou Bou­vier Jr., whose wife, Maude Sergeant, ini­tially bought the prop­erty in the newly fash­ion­able Hamp­tons in 1925. The prop­erty’s name comes from a Na­tive Amer­i­can word for ‘Place of Peace.”

De­spite its boun­ti­ful ameni­ties, how­ever, what may make the home’s $51.99 mil­lion price tag more palat­able to prospec­tive buy­ers is its celebrity pedi­gree. The 100-year-old house is where Jacque­line Kennedy Onas­sis spent child­hood sum­mers.

The din­ing room has built-in book­shelves and an­tique Tif­fany light fix­tures.

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