Some thoughts on the daily health-care strug­gle

The Telegram (St. John’s) - - EDITORIAL -

It seems never a day goes by and some­one is tak­ing a strip off our health-care sys­tem and its mode of op­er­a­tion.

Here in our prov­ince the task of of­fer­ing good, qual­ity care and keep­ing within the con­fines of money al­lot­ted in or­der to op­er­ate has to be a mon­u­men­tal task.

The sub­stan­tial amount of money given by gov­ern­ment to health care boards should be more than enough. Ap­par­ently not.

No time or place is a good time to be­come se­ri­ously ill. Our treat­ment is solely in the hands of our health-care providers.

We should be so lucky. They are good.

Most of­ten the care given un­der the cir­cum­stances by those providers is gen­uine and car­ried out in a pro­fes­sional, car­ing man­ner by com­pe­tent peo­ple.

What most con­cerns me is many of those in dire need, per­haps through no fault of their own have no fam­ily or friends. Their strug­gle must be im­mense.

Thanks to the vol­un­teers who help in that sup­port role, to won­der­ful friends who have a strong be­lief in the Christian faith and re­spect oth­ers who hold strong re­li­gious val­ues in their daily lives.

To put in per­spec­tive, we look

To put in per­spec­tive, we look from the out­side in. We have to make the best of what we have. Un­til you sit eye to eye with a doc­tor and you are told you have a can­cer or an ill­ness that has no cure and is in­op­er­a­ble you can only sur­mise, yet never fully un­der­stand, what lies ahead for that per­son.

from the out­side in. We have to make the best of what we have. Un­til you sit eye to eye with a doc­tor and you are told you have a can­cer or an ill­ness that has no cure and is in­op­er­a­ble you can only sur­mise, yet never fully un­der­stand, what lies ahead for that per­son.

When the bat­tle be­gins and, ul­ti­mately af­ter months of treat­ment, you are privy to the in­side op­er­a­tion of such a sys­tem as health care. You come to un­der­stand full well the qual­ity care that is pro­vided. My main con­cern is those less for­tu­nate than most of us. The blank stare, the feel­ing of de­s­pair.

Those are the ones we must keep at the top of the radar and, in so do­ing, this will be­come a bet­ter place to live.

Ed Ralph St. John’s

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