WIN­TER ON THE BIKE

Triathlon Magazine Canada - - SWIM BIKE RUN TRANSITION - BY ADAM JOHN­STON

f you can’t mea­sure it, you can’t im­prove it.” This quote has been at­trib­uted to a few dif­fer­ent in­di­vid­u­als, but re­gard­less of who said it, they were un­doubt­edly an earnest triath­lete con­tem­plat­ing their win­ter bike train­ing. Test­ing and train­ing go hand in hand, or at least they should. But what do you choose first: the test or the train­ing? How does one in­flu­ence the other? For op­ti­mal re­sults, you need a way of mea­sur­ing your work­load. Work­load is best and most eas­ily mea­sured by power (the unit of power be­ing a watt). Test­ing and train­ing in­doors with­out some sort of pow­er­mea­sur­ing de­vice is chal­leng­ing – the re­main­der of the dis­cus­sion be­low as­sumes that you have ac­cess to a power-mea­sur­ing sys­tem, be it an on-the-bike sys­tem or a power-based in­door trainer. Back to the ques­tion above: What do you choose first, the test or the train­ing? Con­sider the fol­low­ing ap­proach:

1. 2.

De­ter­mine what as­pect of your bike fit­ness you want to im­prove this win­ter. Top-end speed? Hill climb­ing? Longer, sus­tained “tempo” ef­forts? En­durance? Sprints? Se­lect and per­form a test­ing pro­to­col that mea­sures that as­pect of bike fit­ness. Choose and per­form a train­ing plan that ad­dresses im­prov­ing that as­pect of your bike fit­ness. Re-test, iden­ti­cal to what you did in point two above.

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