Xi: Ju­di­cial re­form key to rule of law

Pres­i­dent says a bet­ter use of modern tech­nol­ogy must also be in­cluded

China Daily (Hong Kong) - - FRONT PAGE - By ZHANG YUNBI and CAO YIN Xin­hua con­trib­uted to this story.

Pres­i­dent Xi Jin­ping has urged ef­forts to unswerv­ingly ad­vance re­form of the coun­try’s ju­di­cial sys­tem as it is cru­cial to the coun­try’s rule of law and the en­tire gov­er­nance sys­tem.

Xi, also gen­eral sec­re­tary of the Com­mu­nist Party of China Cen­tral Com­mit­tee, made there mark in a writ­ten in­struc­tion con­veyed to a na­tional con­fer­ence on ju­di­cial sys­tem re­form, held Mon­day in Guiyang, cap­i­tal of Guizhou prov­ince.

In the in­struc­tion, Xi said au­thor­i­ties have made great ef­forts in the past five years in crack­ing dif­fi­cult is­sues and have man­aged to achieve some re­forms that were long planned and talked about a great deal in the past.

Xi also stressed that China should fol­low the path of the so­cial­ist rule of law with Chi­nese char­ac­ter­is­tics, and urged that modern tech­nol­ogy be bet­ter in­tro­duced as part of ju­di­cial re­form.

He called for fur­ther ef­forts to ad­vance the trial-cen­tered re­form of crim­i­nal pro­ce­dure as well as re­forms in public se­cu­rity, state se­cu­rity and ju­di­cial ad­min­is­tra­tion.

Meng Jianzhu, head of the Com­mis­sion for Po­lit­i­cal and Le­gal Af­fairs of the CPC Cen­tral Com­mit­tee, con­veyed Xi’s instructions and made a speech at the con­fer­ence.

Par­tic­i­pants agreed to make use of big data and ar­ti­fi­cial in­tel­li­gence tech­nol­ogy in ad­vanc­ing re­form.

Since the 18th CPC Na­tional Congress in late 2012, a num­ber of ju­di­cial re­forms have been con­ducted.

Cheng Lei, an as­so­ciate law pro­fes­sor at Ren­min Uni­ver­sity of China, said that a no­table re­form is to limit the quota of judges and in­crease their re­spon­si­bil­i­ties to im­prove the qual­ity of case hear­ings.

In the past few years, courts na­tion­wide have in­tro­duced a quota for top judges to en­sure they re­ceive as­sis­tance that frees them from ad­min­is­tra­tive and re­search work, and helps them to pro­duce im­par­tial, well-con­sid­ered judg­ments.

In the past few years, courts na­tion­wide have in­tro­duced a quota for top judges to en­sure they re­ceive as­sis­tance that frees them from ad­min­is­tra­tive and re­search work.

Be­fore the re­form, the coun­try had 210,000 judges, but now it has dropped to 120,000, ac­cord­ing to the top court. The rest have be­come le­gal as­sis­tants and court clerks.

On the adop­tion of new tech­nolo­gies, Cheng said re­form should deal with how to in­te­grate data from dif­fer­ent courts and im­prove data ac­cu­racy.

“How to use the tech­nol­ogy to bet­ter store and pro­tect ju­di­cial in­for­ma­tion is also im­por­tant,” he said.

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