Jus­tice fi­nally pre­vailed: Top li­ai­son of­fi­cial

China Daily (Hong Kong) - - TOP NEWS - By LUIS LIU in Hong Kong luis­liu@chi­nadai­lyhk.com di­rec­tor of the Li­ai­son Of­fice of the Cen­tral Peo­ple’s Gov­ern­ment in the Hong Kong Spe­cial Ad­min­is­tra­tive Re­gion

The cen­tral gov­ern­ment’s top li­ai­son of­fi­cial in Hong Kong on Wed­nes­day said the court de­ci­sion to disqual­ify law­mak­ers who had vi­o­lated the oath-tak­ing laws, and rul­ings against ri­ot­ers who par­tic­i­pated in last year’s Mong Kok riot, brought back jus­tice to Hong Kong so­ci­ety.

“Jus­tice fi­nally pre­vailed,” said Zhang Xiaom­ing, di­rec­tor of the Li­ai­son Of­fice of the Cen­tral Peo­ple’s Gov­ern­ment in the Hong Kong Spe­cial Ad­min­is­tra­tive Re­gion, quot­ing the old say­ing that “rain­bow al­ways ap­pears af­ter storms”.

He was speak­ing at the launch­ing cer­e­mony of a prepara­tory com­mit­tee for Na­tional Day cel­e­bra­tions in Hong Kong.

The city’s High Court dis­qual­i­fied the four law­mak­ers — “Long Hair” Le­ung Kwokhung, Nathan Law Kwunchung, Lau Siu-lai and Ed­ward Yiu Chung-yim — from the Leg­isla­tive Coun­cil on July 14 for vi­o­lat­ing the

The rul­ings (on dis­qual­i­fied law­mak­ers and Mong Kok ri­ot­ers) helped con­sol­i­date Hong Kong peo­ple’s un­der­stand­ing of the ‘one coun­try, two sys­tems’ prin­ci­ple, prompted a right­eous spirit and helped per­fect the le­gal sys­tem.” Zhang Xiaom­ing,

le­gal oath-tak­ing re­quire­ments when be­ing sworn in last year.

On Aug 7, the Dis­trict Court sen­tenced two peo­ple to three years in prison and one to a train­ing cen­ter — a re­ha­bil­i­ta­tion-like in­sti­tu­tion where con­victed young peo­ple learn vo­ca­tional skills — for in­volve­ment in the Mong Kok riot on Lu­nar New Year last year.

By cit­ing the two cases, Zhang stressed that jus­tice has been as­serted and the rule of law was safe­guarded in Hong Kong.

He ad­mit­ted that some de­bates and wran­gling had emerged in so­ci­ety over the past five years. How­ever, the tur­bu­lence was a tem­po­rary phe­nom­e­non on the his­toric stage, Zhang said.

On the bright side, the rul­ings helped con­sol­i­date Hong Kong peo­ple’s un­der­stand­ing of the “one coun­try, two sys­tems” prin­ci­ple, prompted a right­eous spirit and helped per­fect the le­gal sys­tem, Zhang said.

The li­ai­son of­fi­cial men­tioned the in­ter­pre­ta­tion made last year by the na­tion’s top leg­is­la­ture — Na­tional Peo­ple’s Congress Stand­ing Com­mit­tee — re­gard­ing Ar­ti­cle 104 of the Ba­sic Law, which reg­u­lates the re­quire­ments on oaths taken by all of­fi­cials in Hong Kong.

Zhang ex­pressed de­light that the new-term gov­ern­ment has be­gun its work smoothly, and the city was head­ing in a pos­i­tive direction.

As the city has ap­pointed 10 un­der sec­re­taries and eight po­lit­i­cal as­sis­tants, Zhang ex­pects that the “more com­pleted” ad­min­is­tra­tion can de­liver bet­ter work for the city.

Zhang also ex­pressed his good­will to­ward the co-lo­ca­tion ar­range­ment for bound­ary con­trol at the West Kowloon ter­mi­nus for the Guangzhou-Shen­zhen-Hong Kong Ex­press Rail Link which is ex­pected to start run­ning in the third quar­ter next year.

He ob­served pub­lic sup­port for the plan, stress­ing it will bring con­ve­nience to Hong Kong peo­ple and longterm ben­e­fits to the city.

WU HONG / REUTERS

For­eign Min­is­ter Wang Yi and Canadian For­eign Min­is­ter Chrys­tia Free­land, at the Min­istry of For­eign Af­fairs of­fice in Bei­jing on Wed­nes­day, dis­cussed ar­eas of agree­ment.

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