Care home of­fers youth cheap rent

Young sin­gles must vol­un­teer time to as­sist with se­niors at the fa­cil­ity

China Daily (Hong Kong) - - CHINA - By ZHOU WENTING in Shang­hai zhouwent­ing@chi­nadaily.com.cn

Young sin­gles who do vol­un­teer work at a nurs­ing home in Shang­hai, which will open next month, will be able to ex­change hours for rent at the fa­cil­ity.

It is a ground­break­ing at­tempt in Shang­hai, as well as the coun­try, to en­cour­age the young gen­er­a­tion to par­tic­i­pate more in car­ing for the el­derly while al­le­vi­at­ing the heavy pres­sure of soar­ing rent, said Jin Yu­jun, pub­lic re­la­tions man­ager at Shang­hai Shenyang In­vest­ment Man­age­ment Co, which op­er­ates the nurs­ing home in down­town Pu­tuo district.

Four­teen sin­gle and dou­ble rooms — ac­com­mo­dat­ing 20 young vol­un­teers — are avail­able in the Wang­ni­an­hui nurs­ing home, which has room for up to 300 se­niors.

The young lodgers will share a sit­ting room with so­fas, a TV set, a re­frig­er­a­tor and some sports fa­cil­i­ties.

Jin said ap­pli­cants must have a strong pas­sion for help­ing the el­derly and com­mit to a cer­tain num­ber of vol­un­teer hours a week.

“We’re still cal­cu­lat­ing how many hours the thresh­old should be, and how they will be trans­lated into rent,” Jin said.

Four types of vol­un­teer work are en­cour­aged: ac­com­pa­ny­ing the el­derly to read, watch TV or walk; teach­ing them cal­lig­ra­phy, dance or sports; plan­ning birth­day par­ties or fes­ti­val cel­e­bra­tions; and ac­com­pa­ny­ing them to hos­pi­tal for med­i­cal treat­ment.

Com­ments from the se­niors will be col­lected to see whether the vol­un­teers will con­tinue to stay, she said.

“Grad­u­ates with an ed­u­ca­tion in med­i­cal and psy­cho­log­i­cal health will be pri­or­i­tized, and those with knowl­edge of mu­sic or law will be pre­ferred,” Jin said.

Fang Pei’er, di­rec­tor of the home-based el­derly care ser­vices cen­ter in Jing’an Tem­ple com­mu­nity, said such vol­un­teer work will help in­spire so­cial re­spon­si­bil­ity.

Shang­hai is the first Chi­nese city to have an ad­vanced ag­ing pop­u­la­tion. Of­fi­cial statis­tics showed that by the end of last year the num­ber of Shang­hai res­i­dents age 60 or older hit 4.58 mil­lion, ac­count­ing for more than 31 per­cent of the city’s per­ma­nent res­i­dents. Na­tion­ally, the pro­por­tion was 16.7 per­cent.

The num­ber of se­nior res­i­dents will rise to 5.3 mil­lion by 2020, ac­cord­ing to the Shang­hai Civil Af­fairs Bureau.

Grad­u­ates with an ed­u­ca­tion in med­i­cal and psy­cho­log­i­cal health will be pri­or­i­tized, and those with knowl­edge of mu­sic or law will be pre­ferred.”

Jin Yu­jun, pub­lic re­la­tions man­ager at Shang­hai Shenyang In­vest­ment Man­age­ment Co

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