FIONA KO­TUR MARIN

As a so­ci­ety,

Hong Kong Tatler - - The Great Debate -

we are mov­ing fur­ther and fur­ther away from re­al­ity and images of re­al­ism. Even in some­thing such as na­ture photography, images are of­ten al­tered to make them ap­pear more dy­namic. The no­tion of por­trai­ture as we once knew it has ceased to ex­ist. Pho­to­shop ex­ists at ev­ery level and is eas­ily ac­ces­si­ble. As dig­i­tal al­ter­ation be­comes an in­te­gral part of photography, artists, brands and ed­i­tors should be re­spon­si­ble for telling their view­ers how images have been changed. In ad­ver­tis­ing, it’s ex­pected in to­day’s world that prod­uct im­agery is en­hanced and ma­nip­u­lated, but I think this is morally ques­tion­able. A la­belled im­age would give a con­sumer an ed­u­cated view when as­sess­ing the prod­uct, like a con­tent la­bel on a sweater. It might be ad­ver­tised as be­ing a cot­ton sweater, but the la­bel might re­veal it con­tains an acrylic blend—a fact the con­sumer should be made aware of. Fi­nally, Pho­to­shop­ping sig­nif­i­cantly mis­leads us when it comes to rep­re­sen­ta­tions of “at­tain­able” beauty. Per­haps if pho­to­graphs of mod­els were marked, we would all be a lot more for­giv­ing about our­selves.

KO­TUR MARIN CO-FOUNDED THE TORY BURCH BRAND BE­FORE ES­TAB­LISH­ING HER OWN HAND­BAG LA­BEL, KO­TUR, IN 2005

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