ANAIS MAK KEVIN POON

Hong Kong Tatler - - Anais Mak | Kevin Poon -

Se­rial en­tre­pre­neur Kevin Poon, whose di­verse busi­ness ven­tures in­clude a cloth­ing la­bel, event pro­duc­tion com­pany and cof­fee shop chain, joined forces with Anais Mak, the fash­ion de­signer be­hind Jour­den, to cre­ate a work about how we doc­u­ment our jour­neys

“The pictures tell an in­ti­mate story of Kevin’s loves, his fam­ily, his re­la­tion­ships and the things that have shaped his uni­verse,” says Anais, of the col­lec­tion of pho­tos Kevin took with a film cam­era on re­cent trav­els to New York, Los An­ge­les, Thai­land and Paris. The pho­tos will be printed in a large hardback book. “It’s a very in­stinc­tive, very lin­ear method of col­lect­ing what’s im­por­tant to him.”

Kevin be­gan shoot­ing on film a year ago, and en­joys the mys­tery and an­tic­i­pa­tion in­volved when de­vel­op­ing his reels. “I’ve been us­ing some films that are dis­con­tin­ued or ex­pired, so it’s a lot­tery how they will come out. It’s like hav­ing 100,000 fil­ters on your In­sta­gram and you don’t re­ally know which one it’s go­ing to use.” He has also writ­ten short po­ems to ac­com­pany the images. “These are col­lec­tions of peo­ple or ex­pe­ri­ences or vibes that I’ve been get­ting,” he says of the pho­tos. “It’s a lit­tle dif­fer­ent than what peo­ple ex­pect, I guess. The images and also the mes­sage—peo­ple don’t know me as a pho­tog­ra­pher.”

Anais, also work­ing out­side her com­fort zone, has taken a vir­tual ap­proach to travel with an in­ter­ac­tive video to com­ple­ment Kevin’s pho­tos. View­ers will be able to nav­i­gate their way through an imag­ined world by mak­ing choices within scenes. “I wanted to let the viewer have the author­ity to have their own an­gle on the de­signed space that I of­fered,” she says, “in con­trast to pictures, which are re­ally lin­ear in­ter­pre­ta­tions and re­ally voyeuris­tic.”

Their work is a com­ment on the pro­lif­er­a­tion of images in mod­ern so­ci­ety and the way in which they are in­ter­preted and used to shape iden­tity. “I would con­sider my­self the last of the mil­len­nial gen­er­a­tion,” says Kevin. “We are quite ADD in how we process images—ev­ery­thing’s very fast.” Anais agrees that the way we per­ceive images has changed. “Ev­ery day we are bom­barded with streams of images from dif­fer­ent lev­els and all these images are try­ing to form a non­lin­ear narrative in your brain.”

Kevin and Anais say they hope the cu­rated na­ture of their work of­fers some respite from this im­age sat­u­ra­tion rather than adding to it, and they also just wanted to make some­thing that res­onates. “The strug­gles that I face have been faced by other peo­ple— life and love and loss,” says Kevin. “Hope­fully peo­ple can vibe with it and get some­thing out of it.”

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