The list of lists and the crooks of crooks

E DII TO RII A L

Financial Mirror (Cyprus) - - FRONT PAGE -

As Car­ni­val time ap­proaches, politi­cians seem to be tak­ing their cue and im­i­tat­ing the clowns that will be parad­ing up and down our streets next week, only this time, they con­tinue to make a fool of them­selves over the end­less scan­dals that keep on pop­ping up.

First it was the party-ap­proved de­vel­op­ers and crooked su­per­mar­ket own­ers, then it was the in­com­pe­tent bankers who crashed the econ­omy and Cyta trade union bosses tak­ing bribes for land deals, fol­lowed by last year’s rev­e­la­tions of the wide­spread cor­rup­tion in the Caliphate of Paphos where any­thing goes – from free mo­bile phones and con­cert kick­backs, to back­han­ders for the as-yet in­com­plete sew­er­age sys­tem.

Even the lo­cal chap­ter of Trans­parency In­ter­na­tional is­sued a mild warn­ing say­ing that a mere hand­ful of MPs had so far filed their per­sonal state­ments, leav­ing the ma­jor­ity of deputies undis­turbed by the sus­pi­cion that our elected rep­re­sen­ta­tives do not care about con­flict of in­ter­est. That is prob­a­bly why the blame-game is afoot, with ri­val party bosses blam­ing each other for any­thing and ev­ery­thing.

We all agree that in this day and age of a need to keep the moral high ground, the Pres­i­dent of the Repub­lic and his fam­ily mem­bers ought to have been out­right about their ad­vi­sory deal with Ryanair over a prospec­tive Cyprus Air­ways takeover. Iron­i­cally, though, the ac­cusers are of­ten so deeply stuck in rot­ten and stink­ing mud, that no one knows who to be­lieve nowa­days.

On the other hand, the re­cent list of tax evaders in­cludes names and trans­ac­tions that are more than a decade old and have prob­a­bly been lin­ger­ing in a dusty dossier some­where at the lo­cal tax of­fice. Once again, th­ese lists serve no other pur­pose than to push public opin­ion away from the real prob­lems of the na­tion – a strug­gling econ­omy, un­sat­is­fac­tory pro­jec­tions and a des­per­ate need by all to sat­isfy the grumpy civil ser­vants for fear of los­ing pre­cious votes.

Al­most two years into his term, Pres­i­dent Anas­tasi­ades and his team are only now start­ing to talk about re­forms, even though we have yet to hear any­thing about the six Deputy Min­is­ters’ posts that were promised a very long time ago.

Our leader had de­clared in New York that af­ter his heart op­er­a­tion he would be back with a vengeance to get things mov­ing. It would seem that he prob­a­bly for­got his magic wand in his hos­pi­tal room, as he doesn’t have any pix­iedust, ei­ther, in or­der to sprin­kle over the courtiers that sur­round him.

Ah well, back to the car­ni­val pa­rade. At least there we can have a real laugh…

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