Sin­gle peo­ple more likely to be heavy booz­ers

Fiji Sun - - Sun Spectrum -

Anag­ging spouse has been blamed for driv­ing many a per­son to drink. But it seems the old ex­cuse for en­joy­ing one too many in the pub is just that - as new re­search sug­gests be­ing mar­ried makes you drink less. Those who have tied the knot have fewer drinks over­all and drink less fre­quently than sin­gle peo­ple, a study found. Sci­en­tists sug­gest hus­bands and wives mon­i­tor each other’s drink­ing, stop­ping them go­ing over the top.

An­other pos­si­bil­ity is that peo­ple who drink less are more likely to tie the knot. The study – which also found the same ef­fect for co-habit­ing cou­ples – was car­ried out on 2425 iden­ti­cal twins. This was done to rule out the chance that some in­di­vid­u­als might have a ge­netic bias to­wards al­co­hol. It found mar­ried twins drank less than their ge­net­i­cally iden­ti­cal sin­gle sib­lings. Diana Di­nescu, a psy­chol­o­gist at the Univer­sity of Vir­ginia said the find­ings showed that ‘in­ti­mate re­la­tion­ships cause a de­cline in al­co­hol con­sump­tion.

She said: “It is im­pos­si­ble to tell from cor­re­la­tional re­search whether mar­i­tal sta­tus has a pro­tec­tive ef­fect, or whether peo­ple who nat­u­rally drink less sim­ply are more likely to get mar­ried. “By us­ing twins, our study al­lows us to elim­i­nate en­tire classes of al­ter­na­tive ex­pla­na­tions, such as ge­netic pre­dis­po­si­tions and up­bring­ing in­flu­ences, and brings us a step closer to un­der­stand­ing the true im­pact of re­la­tion­ships on drink­ing be­hav­iour.’ The re­searchers sam­pled 1,618 fe­male pairs and 807 male pairs of twins, who were asked their mar­i­tal sta­tus, whether they were mar­ried, di­vorced, wid­owed, sep­a­rated, never mar­ried or co­hab­it­ing. They also asked how much al­co­hol the par­tic­i­pants drank and how fre­quently. The re­searchers found that co­hab­i­tat­ing par­tic­i­pants gen­er­ally drank more fre­quently than mar­ried men and women par­tic­i­pants, but less than their sin­gle, wid­owed and di­vorced coun­ter­parts.

Those who have tied the knot have fewer drinks over­all and drink less fre­quently than sin­gle peo­ple, a study found. Sci­en­tists sug­gest hus­bands and wives mon­i­tor each other’s drink­ing, stop­ping them go­ing over the top.

Sin­gle women and men con­sume more al­co­hol as they self-reg­u­late how much they drink, the study by the Univer­sity of Vir­ginia found.

Sci­en­tists be­lieve mar­ried cou­ples tend to ‘mon­i­tor’ each other’s drink­ing habits more, re­sult­ing in them drink­ing less than those co­hab­it­ing or sin­gle­tons.

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