MAR­CEL BROODTHAERS

L'officiel Art - - Summer Guide -

“Mu­sée d’art mo­derne – dé­par­te­ment des Aigles, Mar­cel Broodthaers”, un­til 5 Ju­ly, Mon­naie de Pa­ris, 11, Quai de Con­ti, Pa­ris 6, www.mon­naie­de­pa­ris.fr

AF­TER HA­VING EX­HI­BI­TED PAUL MCCAR­THY’S CHO­CO­LATE FAC­TO­RY LAST AU­TUMN/WIN­TER, LA MON­NAIE DE PA­RIS HAS GI­VEN NEW LIFE TO ONE OF THE MOST EM­BLE­MA­TIC ART PRO­JECTS OF ITS TIME: MU­SÉE D’ART MO­DERNE – DÉ­PAR­TE­MENT DES AIGLES BY MAR­CEL BROODTHAERS, WHICH IS CU­RA­TED BY CHIA­RA PA­RI­SI IN COL­LA­BO­RA­TION WITH THE AR­TIST’S WI­DOW, MA­RIA GILISSEN BROODTHAERS. L’OF­FI­CIEL ART IN­TER­VIE­WED BOTH WO­MEN.

L’OF­FI­CIEL ART: The ex­hi­bi­tion is built around Mu­sée d’Art mo­derne – Dé­par­te­ment des Aigles, a project concei­ved from 1968 to 1972 by Mar­cel Broodthaers that ori­gi­nal­ly consis­ted of post cards, slide pro­jec­tions, ship­ping crates… was then pre­sen­ted in va­rious lo­ca­tions and be­came the sub­ject of pri­vate views, un­til the ar­tist ter­mi­na­ted it in 1972 at Do­cu­men­ta Kas­sel. Se­ve­ral years of re­search were ne­ces­sa­ry to bring the consti­tuent ele­ments of this ‘fic­tive mu­seum’ back to­ge­ther—which ver­sion are you of­fe­ring? CHIA­RA PA­RI­SI: In pa­ral­lel with the work that we have un­der­ta­ken with Ma­ria Gilissen, which allows im­por­tant de­tails of the Sec­tion des Fi­gures to be shown for the first time in 43 years, we have al­so en­joyed a long and fruit­ful col­la­bo­ra­tion with the same ins­ti­tu­tions and pu­blic and pri­vate col­lec­tions that were contac­ted in 1972 by Mar­cel Broodthaers. We were able to re­cons­truct this le­gen­da­ry Sec­tion with help from each of them. For this ex­hi­bi­tion, la Mon­naie de Pa­ris al­so sup­por­ted a res­tau­ra­tion pro­gramme in part­ner­ship with the len­ding ins­ti­tu­tions. This en­abled us to res­tore pres­ti­gious pieces from the French col­lec­tions, such as a work by Jean-Au­guste-Do­mi­nique Ingres from 1811, an 18th cen­tu­ry woo­den desk from the ves­try of the Fran­cis­can church in Nan­cy, and the gil­ding of an Aigle Em­pire from the Mu­sée des Arts dé­co­ra­tifs de Pa­ris. Since 1972, cer­tain pieces cea­sed to be on pu­blic dis­play and others, ha­ving be­come ve­ry fra­gile, could not leave their ex­hi­bi­tion site, such as La Li­ber­té, 1891 by Ar­nold Bö­ck­lin (the Na­tio­nal­ga­le­rie in Ber­lin, iden­ti­fied as Fi­gure n°22 by Mar­cel Broodthaers) or Fon­taine de Jou­vence, 1957 by Re­né Ma­gritte (the Lud­wig Mu­seum in Co­logne, Fi­gure n°181). The ex­hi­bi­tion was co-cu­ra­ted by the ar­tist’s wi­dow, Ma­ria Gilissen Broodthaers; how did your col­la­bo­ra­tion take form and what choices did you make in terms of mu­seo­gra­phy and ex­hi­bi­tion de­si­gn? For three years, we met re­gu­lar­ly in Brus­sels and in Pa­ris, to piece to­ge­ther the years 1968-1972 du­ring which Mar­cel Broodthaers de­ve­lo­ped his Mu­sée and ex­hi­bi­ted the twelve Sec­tions in dif­ferent places and dif­ferent towns. We were al­so in­ter­es­ted in the em­pha­sis on the fi­nan­cial as­pect and so the Ba­lan­cier d'Aus­ter­litz came in mind, which Broodthaers had wan­ted to ex­hi­bit in 1972 in Dus­sel­dorf but

wasn’t able to as it was a key ma­chine to pro­duc­tion at Mon­naie de Pa­ris at this time (he re­ques­ted images with which he crea­ted a mon­tage). To­day, in the ex­hi­bi­tion, we will ex­hi­bit both the Ba­lan­cier d'Aus­ter­litz in the ves­ti­bule and Broodthaers’ pho­to mon­tage in the Sec­tion des Fi­gures. The pre­sence of these two pieces brings to mind no­tions of ‘im­pres­sion’ and ‘re­pro­duc­tion,’ ideas that were cen­tral to the ar­tist’s work. We have al­so pro­du­ced a Mar­cel Broodthaers me­dal and to­ken with the work­shop at the Mon­naie de Pa­ris, half-way bet­ween the An­gé­lus de Dau­mier and the Sec­tion XIXe siècle.

Among the sa­tel­lite events is a project by the ar­tist: the Dî­ner Mal­lar­mé, which will be in­ter­pre­ted by Guy Sa­voy fol­lo­wing the me­nu put to­ge­ther by Broodthaers in 1965; what re­so­nance does this have to­day? Guy Sa­voy is a gif­ted spea­ker with whom we love to work. This col­la­bo­ra­tion in­volves his in­ter­pre­ta­tion of Dî­ner Mal­lar­mé, an ho­mage that Brood­thers made to the great poet who, for him, per­so­ni­fied di­ver­si­ty (in fashion, gas­tro­no­my, pu­bli­shing, lan­guage, tea­ching, etc.).

Ma­ria Gilissen Broodthaers, you have sha­red Mar­cel Broodthaers’ ques­tio­nings and pro­jects for ma­ny years; what do you re­call about the construc­tion and de­ve­lop­ment of Mu­sée d’Art mo­derne – Dé­par­te­ment des Aigles? MA­RIA GILISSEN BROODTHAERS: He foun­ded the mu­seum in 1968 and over four years ope­ned a do­zen sec­tions (19th cen­tu­ry, 19th cen­tu­ry (sic), literary, folk­lore, 17th cen­tu­ry, do­cu­men­ta­ry, ci­ne­ma, fi­gures, pu­bli­ci­ty, fi­nan­cial, conclu­ding the jour­ney in 1972 with the Mu­sée d’Art an­cien). I was al­ways sur­pri­sed by his ri­gor, his hu­mour, and the co­los­sal quan­ti­ty of work that he pro­du­ced over a de­cade.

Mar­cel Broodthaers in 1972.

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