Not a ban.

Kathimerini English - - Focus -

in­volve state aid, was trans­par­ent and in line with mar­ket con­di­tions. In a state­ment yes­ter­day, the Com­mis­sion said Greek author­i­ties now have to com­plete the trans­fer and de­liv­ery of the air­ports on a 40-year con­ces­sion to Fra­port AG and its Greek part­ner, Copelouzos Group. The deal was ini­tially due to come into ef­fect last year. The 14 air­ports are Thes­sa­loniki – Greece’s sec­ond largest city – My­conos, Santorini, Rhodes, Corfu, Zakyn­thos, Cephalo­nia, Cos, Lesvos, Skiathos, Samos, Ha­nia, Kavala and Ak­tio.

Turkey’s Econ­omy Min­istry yes­ter­day de­nied claims that Turkey has banned im­ports of cer­tain prod­ucts from Rus­sia, adding that all of its trade pol­icy is in line with the World Trade Or­ga­ni­za­tion. The min­istry has added coun­try in­for­ma­tion in tax-free im­port li­censes but does not aim to ban any sup­plier or any prod­uct, it said in a state­ment, with­out re­fer­ring to spe­cific prod­ucts. In­dus­try and trade sources said yes­ter­day that Turkey had un­ex­pect­edly re­moved Rus­sian wheat from an im­port li­cense scheme, ef­fec­tively dis­rupt­ing Rus­sia’s ship­ments to its sec­ond-big­gest wheat ex­port mar­ket. “There is a re­stric­tion for Rus­sian wheat,” Zek­eriya Mete, head of Turkey’s ex­porters as­so­ci­a­tion for grains, pulses, veg­eta­bles and oilseeds, said. “There isn’t a for­mal note on this but Rus­sia has been re­moved from the list of coun­tries from which we could im­port tax-free,” he said.

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