Dandiya

A TO Z INDIA - - Traditional Dance : - - Shiv Shankar

It is very sim­ple dance and is per­formed by a group who move in cir­cles to mea­sure steps, mark­ing time by sticks called dan­dia. Dandiya are the fea­tured dances of Navra­tri evenings in Gu­jarat.

The sticks of the dance rep­re­sent the sword of Durga. Women nor­mally per­form it in a grace­ful and rhyth­mic man­ner in a cir­cle as they ro­tate around the 'mandvi'.

The women wear tra­di­tional dresses such as col­or­ful em­broi­dered choli, gha­gra and band­hani du­pat­tas daz­zling with mir­ror work and heavy jew­ellery.

The main dif­fer­ence be­tween the 'Garba' and 'Dandiya' dance per­for­mances is that Garba is per­formed be­fore 'Aarti' while Dandiya is per­formed af­ter it. Garba is per­formed ex­clu­sively by women, men and women join in for Dandiya.

Also known as 'stick dance' as per­form­ers use a pair of col­or­fully dec­o­rated sticks as props, the cir­cu­lar move­ments of Dandiya Raas are slightly more com­plex than that of Garba.

Ori­gin of Dandiya Raas

Orig­i­nat­ing as de­vo­tional Garba dances, which were al­ways per­formed in Durga’s hon­our, this dance form is ac­tu­ally the stag­ing of a mock­fight be­tween the God­dess and Mahisha­sura, the mighty de­mon-king, and is nick­named “The Sword Dance”. Dur­ing the dance, dancers en­er­get­i­cally whirl and move their feet and arms in a com­pli­cated, chore­ographed man­ner to the tune of the mu­sic with var­i­ous rhythms. Dhol is used as well as com­ple­men­tary per­cus­sion in­stru­ments such as dho­lak, tabla, bon­gos and oth­ers.

The sticks (dandiyas) of the dance rep­re­sent the swords of Durga. The women wear tra­di­tional dresses such as col­or­ful em­broi­dered choli, gha­gra and band­hani du­pat­tas (tra­di­tional at­tire) daz­zling with mir­ror work and heavy jew­ellery. The men wear spe­cial tur­bans and ke­dias, but this varies re­gion­ally.

Garba is per­formed be­fore Aarti (wor­ship­ping ri­tual) as de­vo­tional per­for­mances in the honor of the God­dess, while Dandiya is per­formed af­ter it, as a part of mer­ri­ment. Men and women join in for Dandiya Raas, and also for the Garba. The cir­cu­lar move­ments of Dandiya Raas are much more com­plex than those of Garba. The ori­gin of these dance per­for­mances or Raas is Kr­ishna. To­day, Raas is not only an im­por­tant part of Navra­tri in Gu­jarat, but ex­tends it­self to other fes­ti­vals re­lated to har­vest and crops as well. The Mers of Sauras­tra are noted to per­form Raas with ex­treme en­ergy and vigor.

The women wear tra­di­tional dresses such as col­or­ful em­broi­dered choli, gha­gra and band­hani du­pat­tas, which is the tra­di­tional at­tire, daz­zling with mir­ror work and heavy jew­ellery. The men wear spe­cial tur­bans and ke­dias, but can range from area to area. The dancers whirl and move their feet and arms in a chore­ographed man­ner to the tune of the mu­sic with a lot of drum beats. The dhol is used as well as com­ple­men­tary per­cus­sion in­stru­ments such as the dho­lak, tabla, et cetera. the true dance gets ex­tremely com­pli­cated and en­er­getic. Both of these dances are as­so­ci­ated with the time of har­vest.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.