FABELLE

Business Traveller (India) - - TASTE -

Fabelle is a ven­ture by ITC Ho­tels, and un­like the two choco­latiers men­tioned above, this one has been started by In­di­ans and the beans are im­ported from in­ter­na­tional plan­ta­tions. While it may do lit­tle to the qual­ity of the choco­late, for as men­tioned ear­lier, it is the process and recipe that mat­ters most, Fabelle prides it­self on the pu­rity of its pra­line, ganache, mousse, and other sweet cre­ations. Em­pha­sis­ing on the im­por­tance of a “real co­coa ex­pe­ri­ence”, the beans are sourced from mul­ti­ple re­gions — Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Ecuador, Mada­gas­car, Santo Domingo, Sao Tome and Venezuela. It would be easy for a true choco­late con­nois­seur to iden­tify their dis­sim­i­lar notes from fruity, earthy or bit­ter — when sam­pling a piece of each of the six bars of the “Sin­gle Ori­gin Ca­caos” range. None­the­less, it doesn’t mat­ter if you aren’t an ex­pert on the sub­ject, be­cause they’re tasty all the same.

“El­e­ments” is an­other range of hand­crafted pra­line choco­lates by Fabelle, in­spired by earth, wa­ter, air, wood and Àre. The Àrst two el­e­ments are a clever play on tex­ture — dark mousse in a dark choco­late pod for “earth”, and aer­ated mousse for “air.” It gets in­ter­est­ing as you move to “wa­ter” that is a blend of sea salt and honey, then you have cin­na­mon and coͿee for “wood”, and chilli and can­died mango for “Àre”.

Choco­late pair­ing for Fabelle con­tin­ues with pick­ing the right pra­line when en­joy­ing any bev­er­age of choice. It says, “Choco­lates are also of­ten paired with drinks like wine, coͿee and tea whose taste notes com­ple­ment the in­her­ent taste notes of the choco­late. For ex­am­ple, pair­ing of Fabelle Sin­gle Ori­gin Ca­caos Venezuela 72 per cent with red wine and Fabelle Sin­gle Ori­gin Ca­caos Mada­gas­car 67 per cent with jas­mine tea are among our rec­om­mended pair­ings.”

A book by ITC Ho­tels, ti­tled The Art of Choco­late gives read­ers a crash course on how to pick a drink that won’t over­power or taint the choco­late eat­ing ex­pe­ri­ence, but en­hance it, on the con­trary: Choose high-qual­ity al­co­hol and choco­late. Keep in mind that the good taste of one will not blunt the bad taste of the other. Pay at­ten­tion to the Áavours and aro­mas of your bev­er­age of choice and guess what choco­late would pair with it. If you’re un­sure, choose sim­i­lar (smoky and smoky) or con­trast­ing (sweet and bit­ter) Áavours. With this we can con­clude: choco­late is a univer­sal Áavour and can go to­gether with just about any­thing. From per­sonal ex­pe­ri­ence, I can safely say that all who are fans of the bean have at least one unusual com­bi­na­tion that com­forts them. Mine in­cludes choco­late spread on roti (fabelle.in).

It would be easy for a true choco­late con­nois­seur to iden­tify their dis­sim­i­lar notes from fruity, earthy or bit­ter — when sam­pling a piece of each of the six bars of the “Sin­gle Ori­gin Ca­caos” range.

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