THE A TO Z OF GEN­DER-FLUID MENSWEAR

TURNS OUT, IN­CLU­SIVE FASH­ION DOESN’T MEAN GUYS DRESS­ING UP LIKE GIRLS, AF­TER ALL!

Hindustan Times - Brunch - - COVER STORY - By Sam­reen Tungekar

Ran­veer Singh’s skirt stunt has soft­ened the way we look at wardrobes ‘for him’ and ‘for her’. For men, go­ing the gen­der-neu­tral way has less to do with look­ing like a woman and more to do with free­dom: of sil­hou­ettes, drop-crotch pants and sport­ing a choker. It’s about choos­ing the bright­est colour and team­ing it up with con­fi­dence. Here’s a low­down on all that you need to know about gen­der-fluid fash­ion.

A ac­cep­tance of choice

Fash­ion de­signer Re­sham Karm­chan­dani of The Pot Plant, a brand that de­fies fash­ion stereo­types, says it’s all about ac­cep­tance. “Gen­der flu­id­ity is about be­ing at ease in what you wear. We’re find­ing ways to help men ac­cept what they’re com­fort­able in, with more flowy sil­hou­ettes, dif­fer­ent fab­rics etc.,” she says.

b bling and bright colours

Fash­ion de­signer Nachiket Barve says that gen­der-flu­id­ity has al­ways been part of In­dian fash­ion. “Men have al­ways worn bling, bright colours etc., in dif­fer­ent In­dian cul­tures. It’s just more promi­nent now. Go for se­quins on men’s shirts, bomber jack­ets with patch­work, or even sheers in brighter colours,” he sug­gests.

c cuts and pat­terns with flow

Sil­hou­ettes are be­ing ex­per­i­mented with and de­con­struc­tion is the key. “The fo­cus of gen­der-flu­id­ity is now on asym­met­ri­cal cuts, work like ikat, etc.,” says Re­sham.

d Dif­fer­ent drapes

“Shirt dresses, flared pants, etc., that were ear­lier con­sid­ered fem­i­nine, have now snuck into menswear. Go for a drape kurta the next time you are shop­ping,” says Re­sham.

e el­e­ments like em­broi­dery

There are many el­e­ments that one can add to a look in or­der to make it more gen­der-fluid, be­lieves Nachiket. “Wear pleated palaz­zos, em­bel­lish­ments on shirts, em­broi­dery on shirts, add a bright brooch, wear sun­glasses with orange rims,” he says.

F Fash­ion­ably flo­ral

Spring col­lec­tions show men in flo­ral shirts and rightly so, be­cause flow­ers and pas­tels are no longer re­stricted to women. “Flo­rals are a huge part of this uni­sex trend. Men all over the world are wear­ing flo­ral shirts,” says Nachiket.

g gha­gras and gher­awats

Anju Modi was the de­signer who got Ran­veer Singh to wear a skirt for an event, a much-talked about in­ci­dent. “Mughal in­flu­ence is mak­ing a come­back, such as

gher­awats and gha­gras, anarkalis and an­grakhas. Over time, th­ese were con­sid­ered to be for women only, but not any­more. Men wear

gher­awats and th­ese other gar­ments con­fi­dently now,” she says.

h Hem­lines with­out rules

If you’re try­ing to shift the an­drog­y­nous look from the ramp to real life, the first step would be asym­met­ri­cal hem­lines, says Re­sham. “Try them with long sil­hou­ettes,” she says.

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