Eat the right food to dis­pel the blues

Hindustan Times (Patna) - Live - - Lifestyle - An­jali Muk­er­jee, nu­tri­tion­ist

We all feel sad from time to time, but it’s a se­ri­ous dis­or­der if the feel­ing of sad­ness is con­tin­u­ous. De­pres­sion may look and sound like the blues, but it lasts longer and has a pro­found ef­fect on the body.

Signs of de­pres­sion in­clude los­ing in­ter­est in friends or hob­bies. For those af­fected, work be­comes dull, they ei­ther sleep too much or too lit­tle, you find it dif­fi­cult to con­cen­trate on any­thing and de­velop a non­cha­lant at­ti­tude.

WHO IS PRONE?

Peo­ple who are sen­si­tive and in­se­cure are more prone to de­pres­sion. Women are more likely to suf­fer from de­pres­sion as com­pared to their male coun­ter­parts. De­pres­sion in women can be at­trib­uted to hor­monal fac­tors, pre­men­strual syn­drome, menopause, low haemoglobin lev­els etc. De­pres­sion can also be ge­netic.

Nat­u­ral reme­dies: What you choose to eat has a pro­found ef­fect on your men­tal health. If peo­ple haven’t been eat­ing right most of their lives, then it can af­fect their health in their 40s or 50s.

Eat more car­bo­hy­drates:

Foods rich in car­bo­hy­drates such as rice, pota­toes, pasta and bread, helps to build up brain chem­i­cals such a sero­tonin that af­fect one’s mood and is of­ten found to be lack­ing in de­pressed peo­ple. High lev­els of sero­tonin el­e­vates mood and pro­motes a feel­ing of well-be­ing and sati­ety.

In­crease your in­take of tryp­to­phan: Tryp­to­phan is an amino acid re­quired in the pro­duc­tion of sero­tonin — the ‘feel good’ eu­ro­trans­mit­ter. Eat­ing foods rich in tryp­to­phan such as pump­kin seeds and sun­flower seeds can be help­ful.

Vi­ta­min B com­plex: These vi­ta­mins (thi­amine, ri­boflavin, etc.) help our neu­ro­trans­mit­ters to func­tion prop­erly, which in turn af­fects our sense of well-be­ing. Food rich in B vi­ta­mins in­clude wheat­germ, whole grains, green veg­eta­bles, nuts and seeds.

Rose­mary oil: This is an essen­tial oil, which is a favourite among aro­mather­a­pists for treat­ing de­pres­sion. A few drops of this oil can be mixed in any veg­etable oil or mas­sage lo­tion. It helps to stim­u­late the cen­tral ner­vous sys­tem and re­lieves anx­i­ety.

PHOTO: ISTOCK

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