Is South Amer­i­can cui­sine go­ing to be the next big thing in In­dia?

In light of crick­eter Vi­rat Kohli open­ing a new restau­rant in Delhi that spe­cialises in South Amer­i­can food, we ask chefs whether this is the flavour of the sea­son

Hindustan Times (Patna) - Live - - Lifestyle - Abhinav Verma abhinav.verma@htlive.com

There is a lack of South Amer­i­can restau­rants in the city as the op­er­at­ing cost is high for them NIS­HANT CHOUBEY, CHEF The culi­nary scene in the city is get­ting a bit stag­nant. I think South Amer­i­can can help break the monotony KU­NAL KA­PUR, CHEF It’s not pop­u­lar here, be­cause the con­ti­nent is not a pop­u­lar tourist des­ti­na­tion. It’s on the other side of the globe SABYASACHI GO­RAI, CHEF

If you thought that South Amer­i­can cui­sine isn’t an op­tion in Delhi–– well, that’s changed. Royal Chal­lengers Ban­ga­lore cap­tain Vi­rat Kohli’s new restau­rant in Delhi was opened to the pub­lic for the first time re­cently. The restau­rant is helmed by chef Michael Swamy, who spe­cialises in au­then­tic South Amer­i­can cuisines such as Peru­vian, Ar­gen­tinian and Brazil­ian. It has also got Delhi’s arm­chair con­nois­seurs cu­ri­ous and won­der­ing, “Will South Amer­i­can cui­sine be the new flavour of the sea­son?” “What’s the rea­son for the lack of aware­ness re­gard­ing South Amer­i­can cui­sine in the city’? “Can Mex­i­can be clas­si­fied as South Amer­i­can” (We’ll an­swer this one for you. No it doesn’t, its Cen­tral Amer­i­can) “And is South Amer­i­can re­ally that pop­u­lar on the global culi­nary scene”? Well, yes it is. “Peru­vian cui­sine is one of the most pop­u­lar cuisines right now in the world,” says Chef Sabyasachi Go­rai. “It’s not pop­u­lar here, be­cause the con­ti­nent is not a tourist des­ti­na­tion for In­di­ans. It’s on the other side of the globe, and trav­el­ling there is not easy. But hope­fully, this [new restau­rant] should change the scene,” he adds.

An­other rea­son why the cui­sine is not pop­u­lar in In­dia, is be­cause some of the dishes re­quire lo­cal pro­duce. The raw ma­te­ri­als need to be im­ported and are costly. “I’ve been trained in South Amer­i­can cui­sine and I know first-hand that in­gre­di­ents such as Jam­bal­aya, Etouf­fee and craw­fish are not eas­ily avail­able in the coun­try,” says Chef Nis­hant Choubey. “There­fore, pro­vid­ing au­then­tic Latin cui­sine for restau­rants is not easy. Hence, there is a lack of South Amer­i­can restau­rants in the city as the op­er­at­ing cost is high.” The in­tro­duc­tion of South Amer­i­can cui­sine is a re­fresh­ing change, feels Chef Ku­nal Ka­pur. “Restau­rants in the city usu­ally pro­vide fu­sion In­dian and North Amer­i­can cui­sine. The culi­nary scene in the city is get­ting a bit stag­nant. I think South Amer­i­can can help break the monotony,” he says.

PHOTO: ISTOCK

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