THE SWEET TALE OF STROOPWAFELS

The caramel sweet­ness of this crispy Dutch snack is iconic. Here, ex­perts de-con­struct its smooth de­li­cious­ness

Hindustan Times (Patna) - Live - - Lifestyle - Savi Khanna htc­ity@hin­dus­tan­times.com

If you have ever vis­ited Am­s­ter­dam in the Nether­lands, there’s no way you could have missed the crunchy treats syn­oy­mous with the city. Stroopwafels, be­lieved to be the in­ven­tion of Dutch baker Ger­ard Kam­phuisen, are bis­cuit-y snacks made from flour, but­ter, yeast, milk, and eggs, packed with syrup.

Two lay­ers of baked wafers sand­wich has the sweet fill­ing, which was tra­di­tion­ally Stroop — a syrup made with beet sugar. The fill­ing is now pop­u­lar in the form of jam, sold in the form of concentrated juice from baked and cooked fruits that in­clude ber­ries, ap­ples and pear.

HOW ARE THEY DIF­FER­ENT FROM CLAS­SIC WAF­FLES?

We have all had waf­fles in their varied forms, fin­ished with a range of sweet top­pings. So, how is this Dutch va­ri­ety any dif­fer­ent? “Stroopwafels are thin­ner, crispier and long-last­ing, as com­pared to the clas­sic waf­fle, and are best served with­out any top­ping,” says food blog­ger and stylist Deeba Rajpal.

Pas­try chef Bani Nanda says it is more of a snack than a whole­some dessert. “Stroopwafels are more aer­ated, and I per­son­ally pre­fer eat­ing them as a bis­cuit-y el­e­ment on a plated dessert or as a tea snack. The dough is not made from sugar, but it is en­tirely caramel made, there­fore, it is sweeter than a nor­mal waf­fle,” says Nanda. If you don’t want to bite into them in their ba­sic form, you can use the sweet treats to spruce up other desserts. “You can use them to gar­nish cup­cakes and pies but my favourite thing to do is make an ice-cream sand­wich with it,” says pas­try chef Pooja Dhin­gra.

“It’s great served on top of a hot mug of coffee, be­cause warmth from the coffee melts the caramel fill­ing to per­fec­tion!” she adds.

WHERE CAN YOU BUY THEM IN DELHI?

Even though mak­ing th­ese bis­cuit-waf­fle amal­ga­ma­tions re­quire spe­cial equip­ment and are not yet pop­u­lar in In­dia, you can buy pack­aged ver­sions in gourmet mar­kets and stores that usu­ally have im­ported food prod­ucts avail­able. The price ranges from Rs 399 to

Rs 2000.

TRY THEM AT HOME

We’ve got a recipe sorted, but if you’re se­ri­ous about bak­ing the stroop­wafle like a pro, here are some tips. The waf­fle iron must be pre heated and af­ter trim­ming the waf­fle, don’t throw the sides, you can dec­o­rate cakes with it or save it to make a crum­ble. Also, the waf­fle dough balls can be made and stored in the freezer and you can bake small batches over 4-5 days.

PHO­TOS: IN­STA­GRAM/ MIMI CHOI

Chef Bani Nanda shared Stroopwafels she ate in Volen­dam; (above right) The baker who taught her how to bake them

PHO­TOS: IS­TOCK

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