JNPT work­ers de­mand in­de­pen­dent wage pact

Hindustan Times ST (Mumbai) - HT Navi Mumbai Live - - NAVI - Tas­neem Kausar ht­for­nav­i­mum­bai@hin­dus­tan­times.com Tas­neem Kausar ht­for­nav­i­mum­bai@hin­dus­tan­times.com

Kalam­boli traf­fic po­lice has un­der­taken a spe­cial drive to check vi­o­la­tions by two-wheeler rid­ers.

More than 400 bik­ers have been fined in the drive in the last five days as per the new traf­fic norms laid down by the gov­ern­ment. Fines of over Rs 1 lakh has been col­lected.

Bik­ers with­out hel­met, li­cence, reg­is­tra­tion doc­u­ments and in­sur­ance are be­ing tar­geted. Those found vi­o­lat­ing the norms are hav­ing to cough up to Rs3,500 in fines as per the in­creased penal­ties un­der the law.

The cen­tral gov­ern­ment has hiked the traf­fic fines to curb ac­ci­dents.

There has been an al­most 10-fold rise in fines. The new norms have been en­forced in the state from Au­gust 4.

Ac­cord­ingly se­nior po­lice in­spec­tor of Kalam­boli traf­fic po­lice, Go­rakh Patil un­der­took the drive in his ju­ris­dic­tion.

Those speak­ing on mo­bile phone while rid­ing, trav­el­ling triple seat and driv­ing on the wrong side were caught in the act by the traf­fic po­lice. They were then levied penal­ties.

The drives were con­ducted at Kalam­boli Cir­cle, Pu­rusharth Petrol pump, Bima school, Khanda Colony sig­nal and Road­pali among oth­ers.

"We did not spare any­one. Those who tried to es­cape by speak­ing of their in­flu­ences were the first to be levied penal­ties," said Patil.

He said, “Mo­torists of­ten break traf­fic rules and reg­u­la­tions. Even if they are caught, they care lit­tle be­cause the fines have been minis­cule. It did not have much ef­fect on them.”

He added, “Now things have changed. The penal­ties are heavy now. Those who have had to pay fines will be care­ful the next time. We have be­gun pe­nal­is­ing the traf­fic of­fend­ers un­der the new norm."

The work­ers at JNPT have de­manded that their wages should be in­de­pen­dent of that of other ports’ work­ers as JNPT is earn­ing huge profit.

The Gen­eral Kam­gar Sang­hatana, a work­ers’ union of JNPT has de­manded such ar­range­ment with ship­ping min­is­ter Nitin Gadkari.

The coun­try’s 11 main ports are un­der the con­trol of the cen­tral gov­ern­ment’s min­istry of ship­ping. Of th­ese, JNPT earns over Rs 800 crore profit an­nu­ally.

Sang­hatana leader Suresh Patil said, “There should be no com­par­i­son in terms of wage pay­ment with ports that are in lossess. Here, JNPT is mak­ing huge profit and the work­ers have a large role to play in it.” Colour­ful pots on sale for Dahi Handi at a shop in Vashi. Chil­dren cel­e­brate Dahi Handi at Shivaji Ground on Satur­day. Or­gan­ised by Bal Gopal Mi­tra Man­dal, the event spread aware­ness on or­gan do­na­tion. Dahi Handi will be cel­e­brated on Au­gust 25.

He de­manded, “An in­de­pen­dent wage hike agree­ment should be signed with JNPT work­ers.”

Patil said, “The func­tion­ing of all ports in the coun­try is as per Ma­jor Port Trusts Act, 1963. The cen­tral agree­ment signs wage and ser­vices agree­ment with the five work­ers fed­er­a­tion of the 11 ma­jor ports of the coun­try.”

He said, “As per the agree­ment, work­ers of both the loss­mak­ing and prof­itable ports get sim­i­lar wage hike and fa­cil­i­ties. De­spite help­ing JNPT earn profit, the work­ers do not get the cor­re­spond­ing wage hike.”

STA­BLE BACK­GROUND

For the suc­cess of this ini­tia­tive, the par­ents of th­ese chil­dren need to be sta­ble so that they don’t force the kids to work. San­jeev Jaiswal, Thane civic com­mis­sioner, said, “We have de­cided to give skill-based vo­ca­tional train­ing to the par­ents to help them get per­ma­nent jobs. We will also give them rental ac­com­mo­da­tion so the chil­dren will have a roof over their heads.”

The civic of­fi­cials said a well­rounded ap­proach to­wards this project can let th­ese chil­dren ei­ther can con­tinue in the sig­nal school or join a proper school

BACHCHAN KUMAR PRAFUL GANGURDE

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.