SKY ISN’T THE LIMIT

LUX­URY WATCH­MAKER BRE­ITLING TAKES ITS LOVE FOR AVI­A­TION SE­RI­OUSLY. IT’S A LOVE THAT BEARS TES­TI­MONY IN ITS DIS­TINCT PROD­UCT PORT­FO­LIO

India Today - - BRAND PRODUCT -

The 1989 Pi­la­tus PC-6 Porter has slowed down to 60 knots from a zoom­ing 160; tan­dem mas­ter Jan Eck­mann’s al­time­ter says 14,000 feet, and he’s be­gun the fi­nal count­down. I peep out of the air­craft and there isn’t a chance to voice any hes­i­ta­tion as we’ve al­ready dived. Float­ing on what feels like an air-cush­ion dur­ing the minute-long freefall, with the Swiss Alps and the Jura on the hori­zon, all I can do is gasp in amaze­ment. As the para­chute opens, we float for some time be­fore de­scend­ing; the ex­hil­a­rated first-time sky­diver in me sim­ply can’t get enough. With feet firmly planted on the ground, I re­alise just how im­por­tant avi­a­tion is to Bre­itling; their sky­div­ing team has merely re­it­er­ated their pas­sion for fly­ing. BY ADII DANDE

High Fly­ers

The brand that claims to make not just watches but ‘in­stru­ments for pro­fes­sion­als’, started man­u­fac­tur­ing on-board chrono­graphs for air­craft cock­pits as early as the 1930s. They went on to be­ing the first chrono­graph in space when Scott Car­pen­ter or­bited the Earth three times aboard the Aurora 7 capsule, in 1962, with a Nav­itimer on his wrist; a watch with a 24-hour grad­u­a­tion, vi­tal to dis­tin­guish day from night. It goes with­out say­ing that the Nav­itimer be­came the pi­o­neer in the sphere of space. It has since been equipped with a Man­u­fac­ture Bre­itling move­ment fea­tur­ing man­ual wind-

BOB RU­PANI

sky­div­ing with Bre­itling at 14,000 ft in switzer­land

Bre­itling nav­itimer Cos­mo­naute 1962

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