FOR ME, WRIT­ING IS CATHAR­TIC

AU­THOR AND FILM­MAKER AISHWARYAA RA­JINIKANTH DHANUSH ON CRE­AT­ING HER OWN PATH WHILE GROW­ING UP IN A CELEBRITY HOUSE­HOLD

India Today - - CONTENTS - By CHUMKI BHARADWAJ

How far can the ap­ple fall from the tree? No, this wasn’t a meta­phys­i­cal ques­tion or an ex­is­ten­tial one; only the first thought that crossed the mind when I saw Aishwaryaa Ra­jinikanth Dhanush. With an elfin frame and enor­mous eyes that sim­ply con­sume her del­i­cate face, she is gen­tle, soft-spo­ken to a fault and al­most ner­vous, trip­ping over her own trap­pings in a shoe­box of a room at a sub­ur­ban ho­tel. In Delhi to pro­mote her de­but book, Stand­ing on an

Ap­ple Box, she bears no re­sem­blance, phys­i­cal or other­wise to her su­per­nova fa­ther, movie icon Ra­jinikanth, 66, whose megas­tar sta­tus in Tamil cinema (over 150 films) has re­mained un­shaken since the 70s. His larger than life per­sona has made him a post-mod­ern phe­nom­e­non in South In­dian cinema, earn­ing him the moniker

‘Tha­laiva’ or leader, and in­spir­ing among many firsts, a new genre for jokes as well.

Born to fame and mar­ried to pop­u­lar Tamil ac­tor, di­rec­tor, pro­ducer, play­back singer and lyri­cist Dhanush, she is cine roy­alty like few oth­ers. So it falls to rea­son that hers would be a story worth telling. The book threads together vi­gnettes of her ex­tra­or­di­nary life, in a very “or­di­nary

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