SUS­TAIN­ABLE LIV­ING

Cli­mate change is a re­al­ity no one can ig­nore. This year ar­chi­tects are fo­cussing their en­er­gies on cre­at­ing homes that good for the en­vi­ron­ment

India Today - - COVER STORY - By RIDHI KALE

The world has been look­ing for op­por­tu­ni­ties to de­velop and ac­cel­er­ate sus­tain­abil­ity-ori­ented projects and struc­tures. Go­ing green is not so much a trend as it is a so­lu­tion for the pos­si­ble en­ergy cri­sis. In fact, de­sign ex­perts have been fo­cussing their en­er­gies on it. So, what’s dif­fer­ent this year? New tech­nolo­gies and prac­tices have been adopted that are game chang­ers.

THE TRENDS As we re­fine our learn­ings in net-zero (spa­ces zero on en­ergy, wa­ter and waste to land­fill), the next nat­u­ral step is gen­er­at­ing en­ergy pos­i­tive struc­tures (build­ings that gen­er­ate more en­ergy than they con­sume).

ROOKIE MIS­TAKES A com­mon mis­con­cep­tion is that sus­tain­abil­ity is a layer, to be ap­plied on top of a project in or­der to achieve a green rat­ing la­bel. A sus­tain­able build­ing de­pletes min­i­mal nat­u­ral re­sources dur­ing its con­struc­tion and op­er­a­tion.

COST One should be able to achieve sav­ings of 10 to 15 per cent over a non-green home.

In ar­chi­tec­ture there is no de­fin­i­tive green con­cept, rather a need to cre­ate eco sys­tems

In­fosys Cam­pus with a sus­tain­able de­sign by Mor­pho­gen­e­sis

CHITRA VISH­WANATH, 54 PRIN­CI­PAL AR­CHI­TECT AND MAN­AG­ING DIREC­TOR, BIOME EN­VI­RON­MEN­TAL SO­LU­TIONS WWW.BIOME-SO­LU­TIONS.COM

MANIT RASTOGI, 47

FOUNDER PART­NER, MOR­PHO­GEN­E­SIS, DELHI

WWW.MOR­PHO­GEN­E­SIS.ORG

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